Lightning in Bangladesh: A Visible Threat Causing Considerable Damages to Human & Social Life & the Economy

21 Pages Posted: 20 Sep 2021

See all articles by Mohammad Iqbal

Mohammad Iqbal

South Asian Studies, Melbourne, Australia; RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia

Date Written: August 19, 2021

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to research the severity of lightning in Bangladesh in terms of fatality and level of impact on the economy and social life. Also, an inquiry was made on types of preventive measures that could be taken to minimize the number of lightning related deaths and injuries in the country. In addition, a brief account was added on nature, development, mechanism and physics of lightning prior to embark into findings of the principal questions. This research has proved that lightning as a threat cannot be undermined as isolated incidents in country side. Lightning often receives less attention because thunderstorms are more common and the damage they cause is highly localized. But it should be remembered that lightning is hazardous, can strike and kill people and trigger potentially devastating wildfires. Since 2010, number of deaths and injuries caused by this killer natural disaster has surpassed those numbers caused by other natural disasters such as cyclone, tornado, flood and earthquake. Now is the time for this visible threat to be counted as a national disaster and treat that on priority basis in line with other natural disasters as this lightning menace has gradually taken the monstrous shape over the years in Bangladesh. Therefore, authorities should give more priority to minimize impacts of lightning strikes which kill hundreds of working class ordinary people every year.

Keywords: Lightning, Thunderstorm, Dynamics, Mechanism, Updraft & Downdraft

Suggested Citation

Iqbal, Mohammad, Lightning in Bangladesh: A Visible Threat Causing Considerable Damages to Human & Social Life & the Economy (August 19, 2021). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3907683 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3907683

Mohammad Iqbal (Contact Author)

South Asian Studies, Melbourne, Australia ( email )

Melbourne
Australia

RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia ( email )

Melbourne
Australia

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
46
Abstract Views
184
PlumX Metrics