From Digital Platforms to Facial Recognition Technologies: Structural Challenges to Women’s Activism

Submission to the Thematic Report on Girls’ and Young Women’s Activism for the 50th Session of the United Nations Human Rights Council

9 Pages Posted: 1 Oct 2021

See all articles by Monika Zalnieriute

Monika Zalnieriute

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Law & Justice

Date Written: September 30, 2021

Abstract

Girls and women face many challenges in engaging in activism across the globe. Both online and in public spaces in our cities, which are increasingly surveilled and monitored by government and law enforcement agencies, women face challenges. In this submission, I would like to draw attention to several issues in particular. First, many countries around the world do have discriminatory face-covering laws, which ban Muslim face coverings in public spaces and thus prevent young women and girl activists from Muslim cultural backgrounds from exercising their rights to freedom of assembly, expression and opinion, among other rights. Second, a lot of public places, including cities and airports, are increasingly equipped with facial recognition technology, which undermines women's activism in city streets and squares. Third, in the digital environment and on media platforms, women from marginalized groups, such as LGBTI communities, face new threats and challenges – their speech and expression are often supressed and also weaponized against them. Furthermore, the rise of large-scale data collection and algorithm-driven analysis targeting sensitive information poses many threats for women activists, especially from LGBTI communities, who are especially vulnerable to privacy intrusion due to their often hostile social, political, and even legal environments. I invite the UN Working Group on Discrimination against Women and Girls to:

1) Call on the UN bodies to enhance their understanding of theory intersectionality. I have recently proposed a way to enhance judicial interpretation of reconceptualizing by reference to a modified concept of “harmful cultural practices”, (paper is freely available on SSRN).
2) Call for a ban on the use of facial recognition technology by governments in public city spaces.
3) Call for the development of binding international human rights law for private actors to remedy the violations of freedom of expression of women activists, especially from LGBTI communities in the digital environment.

Keywords: Women, Gender, Activism, Freedom of Expression, Feminism, Feminist Theory, Gender Studies, Protest, Social Movements, Technology, Discrimination, LGBTI

Suggested Citation

Zalnieriute, Monika, From Digital Platforms to Facial Recognition Technologies: Structural Challenges to Women’s Activism (September 30, 2021). Submission to the Thematic Report on Girls’ and Young Women’s Activism for the 50th Session of the United Nations Human Rights Council , Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3933518 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3933518

Monika Zalnieriute (Contact Author)

University of New South Wales (UNSW) - Faculty of Law & Justice ( email )

Sydney, New South Wales 2052
Australia

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
62
Abstract Views
496
Rank
518,411
PlumX Metrics