Exposure to Cigarette Taxes as a Teenager and the Persistence of Smoking into Adulthood

43 Pages Posted: 7 Oct 2021 Last revised: 18 Nov 2021

See all articles by Andrew Friedson

Andrew Friedson

University of Colorado Denver

Moyan Li

Indiana University Bloomington

Katherine Meckel

University of California, San Diego (UCSD)

Daniel I. Rees

University of Colorado Denver; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Daniel W. Sacks

Indiana University - Kelley School of Business - Department of Business Economics & Public Policy

Date Written: October 2021

Abstract

Are teenage and adult smoking causally related? Recent anti-tobacco policy is predicated on the assumption that preventing teenagers from smoking will ensure that fewer adults smoke, but direct evidence in support of this assumption is scant. Using data from three nationally representative sources and cigarette taxes experienced as a teenager as an instrument, we document a strong, positive relationship between teenage and adult smoking: specifically, deterring 10 teenagers from smoking through raising cigarette taxes roughly translates into 5 or 6 fewer eventual adult smokers. We conclude that efforts to reduce teenage smoking can have important, long-lasting consequences on smoking participation and, presumably, health.

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Suggested Citation

Friedson, Andrew and Li, Moyan and Meckel, Katherine and Rees, Daniel I. and Sacks, Daniel W., Exposure to Cigarette Taxes as a Teenager and the Persistence of Smoking into Adulthood (October 2021). NBER Working Paper No. w29325, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3935513 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3935513

Andrew Friedson (Contact Author)

University of Colorado Denver

1475 Lawrence St
Denver, CO 80238-3363
United States

Moyan Li

Indiana University Bloomington ( email )

Dept of Biology
100 South Indiana Ave.
Bloomington, IN 47405
United States

Katherine Meckel

University of California, San Diego (UCSD) ( email )

9500 Gilman Drive
Mail Code 0502
La Jolla, CA 92093-0112
United States

Daniel I. Rees

University of Colorado Denver ( email )

Campus Box 181
P.O. Box 173364
Denver, CO 80218
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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Cambridge, MA 02138
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Daniel W. Sacks

Indiana University - Kelley School of Business - Department of Business Economics & Public Policy ( email )

Bloomington, IN 47405
United States

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