Expressive Trading, Hypermateriality, and Insider Trading

23 Tenn. J. Bus. L. 443 (2022)

15 Pages Posted: 18 Oct 2021 Last revised: 20 Jun 2022

See all articles by John P. Anderson

John P. Anderson

Mississippi College School of Law

Jeremy Kidd

Drake University - Law School

George A. Mocsary

University of Wyoming College of Law

Date Written: 2022

Abstract

The phenomenon of social-media-driven trading (SMD trading) entered the public consciousness earlier this year when GameStop’s stock price was driven up two orders of magnitude by a “hivemind” of individual investors coordinating their actions via social media. Some believe that GameStop’s price is artificially high and is destined to fall. Yet the stock prices of GameStop and other prominent SMD trading targets like AMC Entertainment continue to remain well above historical levels.

Much recent SMD trading is driven by profit motives. But a meaningful part of the rise has been a result of expressive trading—a subset of SMD trading—in which investors buy or sell for non-profit-seeking reasons like social or political activism, or for aesthetic reasons like a nostalgia play. To date, expressive trading has only benefited issuers by raising their stock prices. There is nothing, however, to prevent these traders from employing similar methods for driving a target’s stock price down (e.g., to influence or extort certain behaviors from issuers).

At least for now, stock prices raised by SMD trading have been sticky and appear at least moderately sustainable. The expressive aspect, which unites the traders under a common banner, is likely a reason that dramatic price increases resulting from profit-seeking SMD trading have persisted. Without a nonfinancial motivation to hold the group together, its members would be expected to defect and take profits.

Given that SMD trading appears to be more than a passing fad, issuers and their compliance departments ought to be prepared to respond when targeted by SMD trading. A question that might arise is whether and when SMD-trading-targeted issuers, and their insiders, may trade in their firms’ shares without running afoul of insider trading laws.

This Article proceeds as follows: Part I summarizes the current state of insider trading law, with special focus on the elements of materiality and publicity. Part II opens with a brief summary of the filing, disclosure, and other (non-insider-trading-related) requirements issuers and their insiders may face when trading in their own company’s shares under any circumstance. The remainder of this Part analyzes the insider trading-related legal implications of three different scenarios in which issuers and their insiders trade in their own company’s shares in response to SMD trading. The analysis reveals that although the issuer’s and insiders’ nonpublic internal information may be material (and therefore preclude their legal trading) prior to and just after the onset of third-party SMD trading in the company’s stock, subsequent SMD price changes (if sufficiently dramatic) may diminish the importance of the company’s nonpublic information, rendering it immaterial. If the issuer’s and insiders’ nonpublic information about the firm is immaterial, then they may trade while in possession of it without violating the anti-fraud provisions of the federal securities laws.

Keywords: Insider trading, social media, meme, expressive trading, social-media-driven trading, hypermateriality, materiality, securities enforcement

Suggested Citation

Anderson, John P. and Kidd, Jeremy and Mocsary, George A., Expressive Trading, Hypermateriality, and Insider Trading (2022). 23 Tenn. J. Bus. L. 443 (2022), Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3943396 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3943396

John P. Anderson (Contact Author)

Mississippi College School of Law ( email )

151 East Griffith Street
Jackson, MS 39201
United States

Jeremy Kidd

Drake University - Law School ( email )

27th & Carpenter Sts.
Des Moines, IA 50311
United States

George A. Mocsary

University of Wyoming College of Law ( email )

P.O. Box 3035
Laramie, WY 82071
United States

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