Long-Term Apparent Temperature Exposure and Risk of Depressive Symptoms Among Middle-Aged and Elderly Adults: A Prospective Cohort Study in China

29 Pages Posted: 19 Oct 2021

See all articles by Guoxing Li

Guoxing Li

Peking University - Department of Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences

Jianbo Jin

Peking University

Jing Huang

Peking University - Department of Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences

Zhihu Xu

Peking University

Ru Cao

Peking University

Yuxin Wang

Peking University

Qiang Zeng

Tianjin Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Xiaochuan Pan

Peking University

Abstract

Climate change is increasingly understood to impact mental health. Despite growing research interest, evidence of long-term effect of apparent temperature exposure on the risk of depressive symptoms among middle-aged and elder people is still scarce. Based on the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS), we estimated the long-term effect of apparent temperature on depressive symptoms in middle-aged and elderly adults. Both the influence of low and high apparent temperature was investigated, and the modifications of demographic characteristics, geographical location were also analyzed. Results showed that the increase or decrease of 1 °C from optimum apparent temperature (10.24 °C) would increase the risk of depression by 3.7% (95% CI: 2.6%, 4.8%) and 3.2% (95% CI: 1.9%, 4.6%), respectively. The burden of depressive symptoms attributed to long-term high or low temperature in this study is 182 cases (7.49% or 7.46%) respectively, and the corresponding burden in the national level is 18.42 or 12.46 million cases (9.28% or 6.28%). There is a significant difference in the long-term low apparent temperature-related risk between participant living in northern (HR: 1.041; 95%CI: 1.024, 1.058) and southern cities (HR: 1.170; 95%CI: 1.051, 1.304) (Interaction P value < 0.05), which suggests that China’s Huai River policy has attenuated cold risk in the northern region. Long-term residence in cold or hot regions may increase the risk of depressive symptoms, especially the cold effects on people living in the south. With the dual effect of climate change and global aging, these findings have great significance for policy making and adaptive strategies for the above-mentioned important issues.

Keywords: Depressive symptoms, Middle-aged and older adults, Apparent temperature, Cohort study

Suggested Citation

Li, Guoxing and Jin, Jianbo and Huang, Jing and Xu, Zhihu and Cao, Ru and Wang, Yuxin and Zeng, Qiang and Pan, Xiaochuan, Long-Term Apparent Temperature Exposure and Risk of Depressive Symptoms Among Middle-Aged and Elderly Adults: A Prospective Cohort Study in China. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3945391 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3945391

Guoxing Li (Contact Author)

Peking University - Department of Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences ( email )

No.38 Xueyuan Road
Beijing, 100191
China

Jianbo Jin

Peking University ( email )

No. 38 Xueyuan Road
Haidian District
Beijing, Beijing 100871
China

Jing Huang

Peking University - Department of Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences ( email )

No.38 Xueyuan Road
Beijing, 100191
China

Zhihu Xu

Peking University ( email )

No. 38 Xueyuan Road
Haidian District
Beijing, Beijing 100871
China

Ru Cao

Peking University ( email )

No. 38 Xueyuan Road
Haidian District
Beijing, Beijing 100871
China

Yuxin Wang

Peking University ( email )

No. 38 Xueyuan Road
Haidian District
Beijing, Beijing 100871
China

Qiang Zeng

Tianjin Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ( email )

Tianjin
China

Xiaochuan Pan

Peking University ( email )

No. 38 Xueyuan Road
Haidian District
Beijing, Beijing 100871
China

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