Minority Affirmation in Intergroup Relations: Ingroup Favoritism as Self-Affirmation

30 Pages Posted: 6 Jun 2003

See all articles by Geoffrey J. Leonardelli

Geoffrey J. Leonardelli

University of Toronto - Rotman School of Management; University of Toronto - Department of Psychology

Adam D. Galinsky

Columbia University - Columbia Business School, Management

Abstract

Merging ideas from optimal distinctiveness theory (M. B. Brewer, 1991) and the self-affirmation literature, we predicted that individuals would have a greater need to affirm memberships in minority groups than memberships in majority groups. Furthermore, ingroup favoritism produced by minority group members, but not by majority group members, was hypothesized to be an act of self-affirmation. Two studies demonstrate that, for minority group members, the need for ingroup affirmation increases as identification for the minority ingroup increases (Experiment 1), that at high identification, minorities have a greater need for ingroup affirmation than majority group members (Experiments 1, 2), and that ingroup favoritism by minority group members acts as an affirmation of the ingroup (Experiments 2).

Keywords: ingroup size, intergroup conflict, self-affirmation

Suggested Citation

Leonardelli, Geoffrey J. and Galinsky, Adam D., Minority Affirmation in Intergroup Relations: Ingroup Favoritism as Self-Affirmation. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=399680 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.399680

Geoffrey J. Leonardelli (Contact Author)

University of Toronto - Rotman School of Management ( email )

105 St. George Street
Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E6 M5S1S4
Canada
1-416-946-0731 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.rotman.utoronto.ca/FacultyAndResearch/Faculty/FacultyBios/Leonardelli.aspx

University of Toronto - Department of Psychology ( email )

105 St. George Street
Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E6 M5S1S4
Canada
1-416-946-0731 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.rotman.utoronto.ca/FacultyAndResearch/Faculty/FacultyBios/Leonardelli.aspx

Adam D. Galinsky

Columbia University - Columbia Business School, Management ( email )

3022 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
United States

Do you have negative results from your research you’d like to share?

Paper statistics

Downloads
172
Abstract Views
2,448
Rank
316,371
PlumX Metrics