Indoor Radon Survey in Greenland and Dose Assessment

21 Pages Posted: 22 Feb 2022

See all articles by Violeta Hansen

Violeta Hansen

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Dorthe Petersen

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Jens Søgaard-Hansen

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Frank Farsø Rigét

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Anders Mosbech

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Daniel Spelling Clausen

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Gert Mulvad

affiliation not provided to SSRN

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Abstract

Indoor radon and its decay products are the primary sources of the population's exposure to background ionizing radiation. Radon itself contributes relatively little to the annual effective dose to the lung while its decay products are one of the leading causes of lung cancer, with higher lung cancer risk for smokers due to radon decay products and cigarette smoking synergistic effects.A total of 459 year-long radon measurements in 257 detached and semi-detached residential homes in southwest and south Greenland were carried out, and a dose assessment for adults was performed. The annual average of indoor radon was 10.5 ± 0.2 Bq m-3 in Nuuk, 139.0 ± 1.0 Bq m-3 in Narsaq, and 42.1 ± 0.7 Bq m-3 in Qaqortoq. An average indoor radon concentration of 79.0 Bq m-3 was estimated for adult, person-weighted living in south Greenland. The higher indoor radon concentrations observed in Narsaq than in Qaqortoq and Nuuk towns reflect the underlying geology. Narsaq town is located approximately 7 km from the Kvanefjeld deposit, a low-grade uranium occurrence. Our results also show a positive correlation between indoor radon concentrations and house characteristics. The contribution of indoor radon to the annual effective dose to an average adult was 0.5 mSv in Nuuk, 6.5 mSv in Narsaq, 2.0 mSv in Qaqortoq, and 4.0 mSv for south Greenland adult person weighted. The estimated annual average effective dose to adults in Narsaq is higher than the world's average annual effective dose of 1.3 mSv due to inhalation of indoor radon. Cost-efficient mitigation methods exist to prevent radon entry into new buildings and reduce radon in existing buildings.

Keywords: natural radioactivity, 222Rn, decay products, inhalation dose, Arctic, house metrics

Suggested Citation

Hansen, Violeta and Petersen, Dorthe and Søgaard-Hansen, Jens and Rigét, Frank Farsø and Mosbech, Anders and Clausen, Daniel Spelling and Mulvad, Gert, Indoor Radon Survey in Greenland and Dose Assessment. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4039712 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4039712

Violeta Hansen (Contact Author)

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

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Dorthe Petersen

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Jens Søgaard-Hansen

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Frank Farsø Rigét

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Anders Mosbech

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Daniel Spelling Clausen

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Gert Mulvad

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

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