Concluding Thoughts: Speaking to Be Understood: Identity and the Politics of Race and the Death Penalty

53 DEPAUL L. REV. 1675 (2004)

23 Pages Posted: 17 Mar 2022

See all articles by Emily Hughes

Emily Hughes

University of Iowa - College of Law

Date Written: March 1, 2022

Abstract

This article serves as the concluding article for the DePaul University Law Review Race to Execution Symposium, which explored the role of race in the capital punishment system in the United States. This article examines the contributions to the symposium using keynote speaker Bryan Stevenson’s challenge to think critically about the identity required to confront and challenge the politics of race and the death penalty, specifically noting the importance of the identities of five types of decisionmakers: the jury, judges, policymakers, prosecutors, and defense attorneys. This Article uses Stevenson’s five-part framework as a prism through which to view the comments of the other conference speakers, a juxtaposition that enables critical analysis about the identity of each of the decisionmakers, as well as valuable insight into how each of the decisionmakers thinks.

Keywords: death penalty, capital punishment, race, decisionmaker identity

Suggested Citation

Hughes, Emily, Concluding Thoughts: Speaking to Be Understood: Identity and the Politics of Race and the Death Penalty (March 1, 2022). 53 DEPAUL L. REV. 1675 (2004), Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4047190

Emily Hughes (Contact Author)

University of Iowa - College of Law ( email )

Melrose and Byington
Iowa City, IA 52242
United States

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