puc-header

A Lipid Transfer Protein Ensures Nematode Cuticular Impermeability

27 Pages Posted: 8 Mar 2022 Publication Status: Published

See all articles by Ferdinand Ngale Njume

Ferdinand Ngale Njume

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Adria Razzauti

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Veronika Perschin

Julius-Maximilians-University Wuerzburg - Imaging Core Facility

Gholamreza Fazeli

University of Würzburg

Axelle Bourez

Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB)

Cedric Delporte

Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB)

Stephen M. Ghogomu

University of Buea

Philippe Poolevoorde

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Simon Pichard

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Arnaud Poterszman

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Jacob Souopgui

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Pierre Van Antwerpen

Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB)

Christian Stigloher

Julius-Maximilians-University Wuerzburg - Imaging Core Facility

Luc Vanhamme

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Patrick Laurent

Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) - Laboratory of Neurophysiology

More...

Abstract

The nematode cuticle is a thick and resistant hydroskeleton that acts as a barrier controlling exchanges between the external environment and the internal medium. The cuticle of C. elegans- a free-living nematode - is impermeable to chemicals, toxins and pathogens. Increased permeability is a desirable phenotype because it facilitates chemical uptake, leading to increased sensitivity to agents and reduced risks of false negatives during small molecule screening. Permeability defects can arise from deficiencies in a subset of collagens, surface coat glycosylation or lipid biogenesis. These genes involved in permeability defects are putative targets to fight pathogenic nematodes. Here, we identify the lipid transfer protein GMAP-1 as a critical element setting the permeability of C. elegans cuticle. A deletion mutant for gmap-1 increases cuticular permeability to a range of molecules: sodium azide, levamisole, Hoechst and DiI. GMAP-1 expression in the hypodermis is sufficient to rescue the gmap-1 permeability phenotype. GMAP-1 protein is secreted from organelles in the hypodermis to the aqueous fluid filling the space between collagen fibres of the cuticle. The production or the retention of this fluid within the cuticle is reduced in gmap-1 mutants. GMAP-1 protein binds phosphoglycerides in vitro. In vivo, the lipid composition of the cuticle is modified in gmap-1. Although surface lipids of the cuticle are known to contribute to the permeability barrier of C. elegans, which lipids constitute this barrier and how these lipids are secreted and shuttled to the cuticle surface is unknown. We observe reduced Triacyglycerols, alteration of phosphoglycerides composition and abnormal organisation of the lipids in the cuticle of gmap-1. Extracellular lipid layers, such as stratum corneum or surfactant require lipid transfer proteins to establish. We suggest GMAP-1 is required to form the permeability barrier of C. elegans by setting its lipid content and organisation.

Keywords: C. elegans, lipid transfer protein, cuticle, hypodermis, permeability, epicuticle, surface lipid

Suggested Citation

Njume, Ferdinand Ngale and Razzauti, Adria and Perschin, Veronika and Fazeli, Gholamreza and Bourez, Axelle and Delporte, Cedric and Ghogomu, Stephen M. and Poolevoorde, Philippe and Pichard, Simon and Poterszman, Arnaud and Souopgui, Jacob and Van Antwerpen, Pierre and Stigloher, Christian and Vanhamme, Luc and Laurent, Patrick, A Lipid Transfer Protein Ensures Nematode Cuticular Impermeability. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4052955 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4052955
This version of the paper has not been formally peer reviewed.

Ferdinand Ngale Njume

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Adria Razzauti

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Veronika Perschin

Julius-Maximilians-University Wuerzburg - Imaging Core Facility ( email )

Wuerzburg
Germany

Gholamreza Fazeli

University of Würzburg ( email )

Sanderring 2
Würzburg, D-97070
Germany

Axelle Bourez

Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) ( email )

Cedric Delporte

Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) ( email )

Stephen M. Ghogomu

University of Buea ( email )

Molyko to Buea town Rd
P.O. Box 63
Buea
Cameroon

Philippe Poolevoorde

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Simon Pichard

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Arnaud Poterszman

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Jacob Souopgui

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Pierre Van Antwerpen

Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) ( email )

Christian Stigloher

Julius-Maximilians-University Wuerzburg - Imaging Core Facility ( email )

Luc Vanhamme

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Patrick Laurent (Contact Author)

Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) - Laboratory of Neurophysiology ( email )

Belgium

Click here to go to Cell.com

Paper statistics

Downloads
24
Abstract Views
550
PlumX Metrics