Association of Circulating Platelet Extracellular Vesicles and Pulse Wave Velocity with Cardiovascular Risk Estimation

19 Pages Posted: 1 Apr 2022

See all articles by Markus P. Schlaich

Markus P. Schlaich

The University of Western Australia - Dobney Hypertension Centre

Leslie Marisol Lugo-Gavidia

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Janis Nolde

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Revathy Carnagarin

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Dylan Burger

University of Ottawa - Ottawa Hospital Research Institute

Justine Chan

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Sandi Robinson

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Erika Bosio

Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research

Vance Matthews

The University of Western Australia - Dobney Hypertension Centre

Abstract

Background: Elevated circulating platelet-derived extracellular vesicles (EV) have been reported in conditions associated with thrombotic risk. The present study aimed to assess the relationship between circulating platelet-derived EV levels, cardiovascular risk stratification and vascular organ damage as assessed by pulse wave velocity (PWV).  

Methods: A total of 92 patients were included in the present analysis. Platelet EV were evaluated by flow cytometry (CD41+/Annexin v+). The cardiovascular risk was determined using the 2021 ESC guideline stratification and SCORE2 and SCORE-OP. PWV was performed as a surrogate to assess macrovascular damage.

Results: Risk stratification revealed significant group differences in EV levels (ANOVA, p=0.04). Posthoc analysis demonstrated significant higher levels of EV in the very high-risk group compared with the young participants (12.53±8.69 vs 7.51±4.67 EV/µL, p=0.03). Linear regression models showed SCORE2 and SCORE-OP (p=0.04) was a predictor of EV levels. EVs showed a significant association with macrovascular organ damage measured by PWV (p=0.01). PWV progressively increased with more severe cardiovascular risk (p<0.001) and was also associated with SCORE2 and SCORE-OP (p<0.001). Within the pooled group of subjects with low to moderate risk and young participants (<40 years), those with EV levels in the highest tertile had a trend towards higher nocturnal blood pressure levels, fasting glucose concentration, lipid levels, homocysteine and PWV.

Conclusion: Levels of platelet derived EVs were highest in those patients with very high CV risk. Within a pooled group of patients with low to moderate risk, an unfavourable cardiometabolic profile was present with higher EV levels.

Note:
Funding Information: This research received no grant from any funding agency.

Declaration of Interests: MPS is supported by an NHMRC Research Fellowship and has received consulting fees, and/or travel and research support from Medtronic, Abbott, Novartis, Servier, Pfizer, and Boehringer-Ingelheim; LMLG has received a grant from the National Council on Science and Technology, Mexico (CONACYT). All other authors have no conflict of interest to declare.

Ethics Approval Statement: The study complied with the Declaration of Helsinki and received approval from the University of Western Australia research ethics committee. All participants provided written consent for the study.

Keywords: thrombosis, Platelets, Extracellular vesicles, cardiovascular risk

Suggested Citation

Schlaich, Markus P. and Lugo-Gavidia, Leslie Marisol and Nolde, Janis and Carnagarin, Revathy and Burger, Dylan and Chan, Justine and Robinson, Sandi and Bosio, Erika and Matthews, Vance, Association of Circulating Platelet Extracellular Vesicles and Pulse Wave Velocity with Cardiovascular Risk Estimation. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4072444 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4072444

Markus P. Schlaich (Contact Author)

The University of Western Australia - Dobney Hypertension Centre ( email )

Leslie Marisol Lugo-Gavidia

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Janis Nolde

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Revathy Carnagarin

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Dylan Burger

University of Ottawa - Ottawa Hospital Research Institute ( email )

Ottawa
Canada

Justine Chan

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Sandi Robinson

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Erika Bosio

Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research ( email )

5 Robin Warren Dr.
Murdoch, 6150
Australia

Vance Matthews

The University of Western Australia - Dobney Hypertension Centre ( email )

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