Socialising Attribution of Climate Events: Progress, Myths and Future Outlook

21 Pages Posted: 27 Apr 2022

See all articles by Emily Boyd

Emily Boyd

Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies (LUCSUS)

Friedereke EL Otto

Imperial College London

Salvatore Paolo De Rosa

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Rupert Stuart-Smith

Oxford Sustainable Law Programme, University of Oxford

Luke J. Harrington

Victoria University of Wellington - Te Herenga Waka

Emmanuel Raju

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Richard G. Jones

Met Office

J S

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Rachel James

University of Bristol

Kristian Cedervall Lauta

University of Copenhagen - COPE - Copenhagen Center for Disaster Research; University of Copenhagen - Faculty of Law

Abstract

In the past decade there has been increasing attention on the development of the science of climate attribution and the potential challenges and opportunities presented by this science. Attribution is a branch of climate science which focuses on assessing the causal links between anthropogenic and natural influences on the climate manifested in slow-onset and individual extreme weather events. In this paper we aim to to give a brief progress update on event attribution science from the literature. We focus our assessment of the literature on three myths around attribution and correct the perspective on what science can and cannot do. We do this conceptually using myth analysis which has been applied to understand ideologies, ‘common sense’ and accepted truths in a range of environmental topics. Finally, we assess discursive interactions between how and where climate science and in particular attribution could expand to be more useful at the science-society interface, and how civil society could be involved to use or to shape attribution science. This final aim is the “socialising attribution” and clarifies what attribution could do.

Keywords: Myths, socialising, event attribution

Suggested Citation

Boyd, Emily and Otto, Friedereke EL and Paolo De Rosa, Salvatore and Stuart-Smith, Rupert and Harrington, Luke J. and Raju, Emmanuel and Jones, Richard G. and S, J and James, Rachel and Lauta, Kristian Cedervall, Socialising Attribution of Climate Events: Progress, Myths and Future Outlook. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4095068 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4095068

Emily Boyd (Contact Author)

Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies (LUCSUS) ( email )

Friedereke EL Otto

Imperial College London ( email )

South Kensington Campus
Exhibition Road
London, SW7 2AZ
United Kingdom

Salvatore Paolo De Rosa

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Rupert Stuart-Smith

Oxford Sustainable Law Programme, University of Oxford ( email )

Luke J. Harrington

Victoria University of Wellington - Te Herenga Waka ( email )

P.O. Box 600
Wellington, 6140
New Zealand

Emmanuel Raju

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Richard G. Jones

Met Office ( email )

J S

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Rachel James

University of Bristol ( email )

Kristian Cedervall Lauta

University of Copenhagen - COPE - Copenhagen Center for Disaster Research ( email )

Thorvaldsensvej 57
Copenhagen, 1871
Denmark

University of Copenhagen - Faculty of Law ( email )

Studiestraede 6
Studiestrade 6
Copenhagen, DK-1455
Denmark

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