Fine Particle Components and Risk of Psychiatric Hospitalization in the U.S

20 Pages Posted: 9 May 2022

See all articles by Xinye Qiu

Xinye Qiu

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Yaguang Wei

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Heresh Amini

University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Department of Public Health

Cuicui Wang

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Marc Weisskopf

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Petros Koutrakis

Harvard University - Department of Environmental Health

Joel Schwartz

Harvard University - Department of Epidemiology

Abstract

BackgroundThere is a lack of evidence for the associations between atmospheric particle components exposure and psychiatric health. We aimed to identify the toxic particle component(s) and source(s) related with psychiatric illness.MethodsUsing Health Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) State Inpatient Databases (SIDs), we analyzed the relative risk (RR) of psychiatric hospitalization associated with increased residential exposure to 14 particle components (Zn, V, Si, Pb, Ni, K, Fe, Cu, Ca, Br, sulfate (SO4 2- ), nitrate (NO3 - ), organic carbon (OC), and elemental carbon (EC)). We covered the residents of eight U.S. states, who contributed to 5,012,041 psychiatric admissions over 2002 -2018. Single component models were conducted via fitting zero-inflated negative binomial regression for each component with aggregated counts of total psychiatric hospitalizations per ZIP code per year as dependent variable. A multi-components regression was modeled by including four main mass components (OC, EC, nitrate and sulfate) simultaneously. We used Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF) to identify particle source factors and obtained the source-specific estimates. Generalized Weighted Quantile Sum (gWQS) Regression was applied to obtain an overall mixture effect.ResultsSulfate, Fe, Pb and Zn were associated with the largest risk increases in single-component models. For each interquartile (IQR) increase in OC and sulfate, we observed an RR of 1.10 (95% CI, 1.07 - 1.12) and 1.14 (95% CI, 1.12 - 1.16) in multi-components model. The biggest harmful associations were observed for metal industry source (high loadings of Pb and sulfate). For one quartile increase in components mixture score, we observed an adjusted RR of 1.24 (95% CI, 1.21 - 1.26).ConclusionLiving in areas with higher levels of particle components was associated with increased risk of psychiatric hospitalization among the residents in eight U.S. states. Certain components (i.e. Pb, sulfate) and sources (metal industry) were the most related.

Keywords: Population Mental Health, Lead, Sulfate, Metal Industry

Suggested Citation

Qiu, Xinye and Wei, Yaguang and Amini, Heresh and Wang, Cuicui and Weisskopf, Marc and Koutrakis, Petros and Schwartz, Joel, Fine Particle Components and Risk of Psychiatric Hospitalization in the U.S. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4104308 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4104308

Xinye Qiu (Contact Author)

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Yaguang Wei

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Heresh Amini

University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Department of Public Health ( email )

Denmark

Cuicui Wang

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Marc Weisskopf

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health ( email )

Petros Koutrakis

Harvard University - Department of Environmental Health ( email )

401 Park Dr
Boston, MA 02215
United States

Joel Schwartz

Harvard University - Department of Epidemiology ( email )

655 Huntington Ave.
Boston, MA 02115
United States
(617) 384-8752 (Phone)
(617) 384-8745 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/facres/schwrtz.html

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
39
Abstract Views
159
PlumX Metrics