A 'Dubious Expediency': How Race-Preferential Admissions Policies on Campus Hurt Minority Students

84 Pages Posted: 10 May 2022 Last revised: 26 Oct 2022

See all articles by Gail L. Heriot

Gail L. Heriot

American Civil Rights Project; U.S. Commission on Civil Rights; Manhattan Institute

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: May 9, 2022

Abstract

Mounting empirical research shows that race-preferential admissions policies are doing more harm than good. Instead of increasing the numbers of African Americans entering high-status careers, these policies reduce those numbers relative to what we would have had if colleges and universities had followed race-neutral policies. We have fewer African-American scientists, physicians, and engineers and likely fewer lawyers and college professors. If, as the evidence indicates, the effects of race-preferential admissions policies are exactly the opposite of what was originally intended, it is difficult to understand why anyone would wish to support them.

Keywords: affirmative action, mismatch

Suggested Citation

Heriot, Gail L., A 'Dubious Expediency': How Race-Preferential Admissions Policies on Campus Hurt Minority Students (May 9, 2022). San Diego Legal Studies Paper, 22-008, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4104584 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4104584

Gail L. Heriot (Contact Author)

American Civil Rights Project ( email )

P.O. Box 12207
Dallas, TX 75225
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.americancivilrightsproject.org/

U.S. Commission on Civil Rights

1331 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Suite 1150
Washington, DC 20425

Manhattan Institute ( email )

52 Vanderbilt Avenue
New York, NY 10017
United States

Do you have negative results from your research you’d like to share?

Paper statistics

Downloads
860
Abstract Views
9,335
Rank
7,368
PlumX Metrics