Automation and the Changing Nature of Work

34 Pages Posted: 19 May 2022

See all articles by Cecily Josten

Cecily Josten

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - London School of Economics

Grace Lordan

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - London School of Economics

Abstract

This study identifies the job attributes, and in particular skills and abilities, which predict the likelihood a job is recently automatable drawing on the Josten and Lordan (2020) classification of automatability, EU labour force survey data and a machine learning regression approach. We find that skills and abilities which relate to non-linear abstract thinking are those that are the safest from automation. We also find that jobs that require 'people' engagement interacted with 'brains' are also less likely to be automated. The skills that are required for these jobs include soft skills. Finally, we find that jobs that require physically making objects or physicality more generally are most likely to be automated unless they involve interaction with 'brains' and/or 'people'.

Keywords: work, automatability, job skills, job abilities, EU Labour Force Survey

JEL Classification: J21, J00

Suggested Citation

Josten, Cecily and Lordan, Grace, Automation and the Changing Nature of Work. IZA Discussion Paper No. 15180, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4114740 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4114740

Cecily Josten (Contact Author)

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - London School of Economics

United Kingdom

Grace Lordan

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - London School of Economics ( email )

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