Missing Women in Colonial India

56 Pages Posted: 27 May 2022

See all articles by James Fenske

James Fenske

University of Warwick

Bishnupriya Gupta

University of Warwick - Department of Economics

Cora Neumann

University of Warwick

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: April 1, 2022

Abstract

We construct novel data on female population shares by age, district, and religion in South Asia from 1881 to 1931. Sex ratios skew male in Northern India and are more balanced in Southern and Eastern India, including Burma. Male-biased sex ratios emerge most visibly after age 10, and this is not specific to any one region, religion, or time period. Sikhs have the most male-biased sex ratios, followed by Hindus, Muslims, and Jains. The female share correlates across religious groups within districts. Evidence that sex ratios correlate with suitability for wheat and rice is weaker than suggested by the existing literature.

JEL Classification: J16, N35

Suggested Citation

Fenske, James and Gupta, Bishnupriya and Neumann, Cora, Missing Women in Colonial India (April 1, 2022). CEPR Discussion Paper No. DP17189, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4121364

James Fenske (Contact Author)

University of Warwick ( email )

Gibbet Hill Rd.
Coventry, CV4 8UW
United Kingdom

Bishnupriya Gupta

University of Warwick - Department of Economics ( email )

Coventry CV4 7AL
United Kingdom

Cora Neumann

University of Warwick ( email )

Gibbet Hill Rd.
Coventry, West Midlands CV4 8UW
United Kingdom

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
0
Abstract Views
85
PlumX Metrics