Health Inequality, Education and Medical Innovation

58 Pages Posted: 7 Jun 2003 Last revised: 2 Nov 2010

See all articles by Sherry Glied

Sherry Glied

Dean; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Adriana Lleras-Muney

Princeton University - Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: June 2003

Abstract

Recent studies suggest that health inequalities across socio-economic groups in the US are large and have been growing. We hypothesize that, as in other, non-health contexts, this pattern occurs because more educated people are better able than to take advantage of technological advances in medicine than are the less educated. We test this hypothesis by relating education gradients in mortality with measures medical innovation. We focus on overall mortality and cancer mortality, examining both the incidence of cancer and survival conditional on disease incidence. We find evidence supporting the hypothesis that education gradients are steeper for diseases with more innovation.

Suggested Citation

Glied, Sherry A. and Lleras-Muney, Adriana, Health Inequality, Education and Medical Innovation (June 2003). NBER Working Paper No. w9738, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=414741

Sherry A. Glied (Contact Author)

Dean ( email )

The Puck Building
295 Lafayette Street, Second Floor
New York, NY 10012
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Adriana Lleras-Muney

Princeton University - Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs ( email )

Princeton University
Princeton, NJ 08544-1021
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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