Disclosure Blues: Should You Tell Colleagues About Your Mental Illness?

The Chronicle of Higher Education 2014

4 Pages Posted: 11 Jul 2022

See all articles by Katie Rose Guest Pryal

Katie Rose Guest Pryal

University of North Carolina School of Law

Date Written: June 13, 2014

Abstract

Should higher education faculty with mental disabilities disclose their disabilities to their colleagues or institutions? In this essay, drawing on interviews, research, and my own experience as a disabled person, I show why disclosure is rarely the right choice. Stigma attached to mental disability in higher education is still too strong. In particular, the risk of repercussions for graduate students, contingent faculty, and pre-tenure faculty is especially high because of their lack of institutional power. We are, in academia, still devoted to the mythos of the good man speaking well, the professor as bastion of reason, the cogito ergo sum. (Essay originally published in The Chronicle of Higher Education Vitae, no longer in print.)

Keywords: mental health, mental illness, mental disability, neurodiversity, disability, disability studies

Suggested Citation

Pryal, Katie Rose Guest, Disclosure Blues: Should You Tell Colleagues About Your Mental Illness? (June 13, 2014). The Chronicle of Higher Education 2014, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4158926 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4158926

Katie Rose Guest Pryal (Contact Author)

University of North Carolina School of Law ( email )

Van Hecke-Wettach Hall, 160 Ridge Road
CB #3380
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3380
United States
919-962-2558 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://katieroseguestpryal.com

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