The New Thoreaus

32 Pages Posted: 7 Aug 2022 Last revised: 10 Oct 2022

See all articles by Mark Movsesian

Mark Movsesian

St. John's University School of Law

Date Written: August 4, 2022

Abstract

Fifty years ago, in Wisconsin v. Yoder, the Supreme Court famously indicated that “religion” denotes a communal rather than a purely individual phenomenon. An organized group like the Amish would qualify as religious, the Court wrote, but a solitary seeker like the 19th Century Transcendentalist, Henry David Thoreau, would not. At the time, the question was mostly peripheral; hardly any Americans claimed to have their own, personal religions that would make it difficult for them to comply with civil law. In the intervening decades, though, American religion has changed. One-fifth of us—roughly 66 million people—now claim, like Thoreau, to follow our own, idiosyncratic spiritual paths. The New Thoreaus already have begun to appear in the cases, including recent vaccine mandate challenges, and courts will increasingly face the question whether purely idiosyncratic beliefs and practices qualify as religious for legal purposes. In this essay, I argue that Yoder’s insight was basically correct: the existence of a religious community is a crucial factor in the definition of religion. Religion cannot mean an exclusively communal phenomenon; a categorical rule would slight a long American tradition of respecting individual religious conscience and create difficult line-drawing problems. Nonetheless, the farther one gets from a religious community, the more idiosyncratic one’s spiritual path, the less plausible it is to claim that one’s beliefs and practices are religious, for legal purposes.

Keywords: Religion, Free Exercise of Religion, Religious Accommodations, Nones, Vaccines, COVID-19

JEL Classification: K1

Suggested Citation

Movsesian, Mark, The New Thoreaus (August 4, 2022). Loyola University Chicago Law Journal, Forthcoming , St. John's Legal Studies Research Paper No. 22-0012, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4181953 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4181953

Mark Movsesian (Contact Author)

St. John's University School of Law ( email )

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HOME PAGE: http://www.stjohns.edu/academics/graduate/law/faculty/profiles/Movsesian

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