Association between Parents Experiencing Ongoing Problems from COVID-19 and Adolescents Reporting Long COVID Six Months after a Positive or Negative SARS-CoV-2 PCR-Test: Prospective, National Cohort Study in England

9 Pages Posted: 30 Aug 2022

See all articles by Marta Bertran

Marta Bertran

Immunisation and Vaccine Preventable Diseases,UK Health Security Agency

Snehal Pinto Pereira

University College London - Centre for Perioperative Medicine

Manjula D Nugawela

UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health

Terence J. Stephenson

University College London - Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health

Roz Shafran

University College London - Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health

Tamsin Ford

University of Cambridge - Department of Psychiatry

Marta Buszewicz

Research Department of Primary Care & Population Health, University College London Medical School

Elizabeth Whittaker

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust - Paediatric Infectious Diseases Department

Isobel Heyman

University College London - Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health

Terry Segal

Suffolk University Law School

Emma Dalrymple

University College London - Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health

Shamez N. Ladhani

Government of the United Kingdom - Immunisation and Countermeasures Division; St. George’s University of London - Paediatric Infectious Diseases Research Group

Date Written: August 14, 2022

Abstract

In a national cohort of 12,788 adolescents, those reporting parents experiencing ongoing problems from COVID-19 had 1.79-fold (95%CI: 1.58-2.02) higher odds of experiencing LONG COVID 6 months after a SARS-CoV-2 PCR-test than those reporting parents without ongoing symptoms, independent of age, sex, deprivation and SARS-CoV-2 infection status.

Note:
Funding Information: This work was supported by the Department of Health and Social Care, in their capacity as the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), and by the UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) who have awarded funding grant number COVLT0022. All research at Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health is made possible by the NIHR Great Ormond Street Hospital Biomedical Research Centre. SMPP is supported by a UK Medical Research Council Career Development Award (ref: MR/P020372/1).

Conflict of Interests: TS is Chair of the Health Research Authority and therefore recused himself from the research ethics application. All other authors declare no competing interests.

Ethical Approval: The study was approved by Yorkshire and the Humber–South Yorkshire Research Ethics Committee (REC reference: 21/YH/0060; IRAS project ID: 293495). UKHSA has legal permission, provided by Regulation 3 of The Health Service (Control of Patient Information) Regulations 2002, to process patient confidential information for national surveillance of communicable diseases. Individual patient consent is not required for initial invitation to the study.

Keywords: LONG COVID, SARS-CoV-2, children and young people, matched cohort study

Suggested Citation

Bertran, Marta and Pinto Pereira, Snehal and Nugawela, Manjula and Stephenson, Terence J. and Shafran, Roz and Ford, Tamsin and Buszewicz, Marta and Whittaker, Elizabeth and Heyman, Isobel and Segal, Terry and Dalrymple, Emma and Ladhani, Shamez N., Association between Parents Experiencing Ongoing Problems from COVID-19 and Adolescents Reporting Long COVID Six Months after a Positive or Negative SARS-CoV-2 PCR-Test: Prospective, National Cohort Study in England (August 14, 2022). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4192732 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4192732

Marta Bertran (Contact Author)

Immunisation and Vaccine Preventable Diseases,UK Health Security Agency ( email )

61 Colindale Avenue
London, NW9 5EQ
United Kingdom

Snehal Pinto Pereira

University College London - Centre for Perioperative Medicine ( email )

Manjula Nugawela

UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health ( email )

30 Guilford Street
London, England WC1N 1EH
United Kingdom

Terence J. Stephenson

University College London - Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health ( email )

30 Guilford Street
London, England WC1N 1EH
United Kingdom

Roz Shafran

University College London - Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health ( email )

30 Guilford Street
London, England WC1N 1EH
United Kingdom

Tamsin Ford

University of Cambridge - Department of Psychiatry ( email )

Marta Buszewicz

Research Department of Primary Care & Population Health, University College London Medical School ( email )

London
United Kingdom

Elizabeth Whittaker

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust - Paediatric Infectious Diseases Department ( email )

Praed St
London
United Kingdom

Isobel Heyman

University College London - Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health ( email )

Terry Segal

Suffolk University Law School ( email )

120 Tremont Street
Boston, MA 02108-4977
United States

Emma Dalrymple

University College London - Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health

30 Guilford Street
London, England WC1N 1EH
United Kingdom

Shamez N. Ladhani

Government of the United Kingdom - Immunisation and Countermeasures Division ( email )

61 Colindale Avenue
London, NW9 5EQ
United Kingdom

St. George’s University of London - Paediatric Infectious Diseases Research Group

London
United Kingdom

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