Perceived Structural Vulnerabilities among Detained Noncitizen Immigrants in Minnesota

Minnesota Legal Studies Research Paper No. 22-13

Tsuchiya K, Toles O, Levesque C, Horner K, Ryu E, Chan L, et al. (2021) Perceived structural vulnerabilities among detained noncitizen immigrants in Minnesota. PLoS ONE 16(6): e0252232. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0252232, 2021

22 Pages Posted: 12 Sep 2022 Last revised: 27 Sep 2022

See all articles by Kazumi Tsuchiya

Kazumi Tsuchiya

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Minnesota Population Center

Olivia Toles

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - College of Biological Sciences

Christopher Levasque

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Minnesota Population Center; University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Dept of Sociology

Kimberly Horner

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs

Eric Ryu

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs

Jack DeWaard

University of Minnesota - Dept. of Sociology and Minnesota Population Center

Linus Chan

University of Minnesota School of Law - Center for New Americans

Date Written: September 9, 2022

Abstract

Across several decades there has been an unprecedented increase in immigration enforcement including detention and deportation. Immigration detention profoundly impacts those experiencing detention and their family members. An emerging area of research has found that immigrants experience a number of challenges which constrain and limit their decisions, choices, and options for security and integration in the United States due to social, political and structural determinants. These determinants lead to greater structural vulnerabilities among immigrants. The purpose of the current study was to illuminate the perceived vulnerabilities of detained noncitizen immigrants as they are raised and described while attending case hearings at the Bloomington, Minnesota immigration court. Through conducting a thematic analysis of notes derived from third party immigration court observers, three areas of perceived vulnerability were identified. These perceived vulnerabilities include 1) migration and motivations to migrate, 2) structural vulnerabilities (e.g., discrimination, financial insecurity, social ties and family support, stable or fixed residence, English language proficiency, health and mental health) in the US, and 3) challenges in navigating immigration detention. These findings demonstrate that noncitizen immigrants who are undergoing immigration detention are experiencing multiple intersecting vulnerabilities which profoundly impact their lives. Collaborative efforts across sectors are needed to work towards comprehensive immigration reforms including both short-term and long-term solutions to address pressing issues for noncitizens undergoing immigration detention.

Keywords: Immigration, deportation, detention court, vulnerabilities

JEL Classification: K37

Suggested Citation

Tsuchiya, Kazumi and Toles, Olivia and Levasque, Christopher and Horner, Kimberly and Ryu, Eric and DeWaard, Jack and Chan, Linus, Perceived Structural Vulnerabilities among Detained Noncitizen Immigrants in Minnesota (September 9, 2022). Minnesota Legal Studies Research Paper No. 22-13, Tsuchiya K, Toles O, Levesque C, Horner K, Ryu E, Chan L, et al. (2021) Perceived structural vulnerabilities among detained noncitizen immigrants in Minnesota. PLoS ONE 16(6): e0252232. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0252232, 2021, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4214828 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4214828

Kazumi Tsuchiya

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Minnesota Population Center

Olivia Toles

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - College of Biological Sciences

Christopher Levasque

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Minnesota Population Center

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Dept of Sociology

Kimberly Horner

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs

Eric Ryu

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs

Jack DeWaard

University of Minnesota - Dept. of Sociology and Minnesota Population Center ( email )

110 Wulling Hall, 86 Pleasant St, S.E.
308 Harvard Street SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455
United States

Linus Chan (Contact Author)

University of Minnesota School of Law - Center for New Americans ( email )

229 19th Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55455
United States

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