Who Affects Whom in Daily Newspaper Markets?

Posted: 22 Aug 2003

See all articles by Lisa M. George

Lisa M. George

Hunter College, CUNY; The Graduate Center, CUNY

Joel Waldfogel

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Carlson School of Management; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Department of Economics

Abstract

When consumers share similar preferences, additional consumers will bring forth products that confer positive "preference externalities" on others. However, if distinct groups of consumers have substantially different preferences, the groups bring forth products with more appeal to themselves and less appeal to others. We document that in their capacity as daily newspaper consumers, blacks and whites are more likely to buy daily newspapers in markets with larger black and white populations, respectively. Similar results hold for Hispanics and non-Hispanics, but not by education, income, or age. We provide evidence that product positioning underlies our results.

Suggested Citation

George, Lisa Megargle and Waldfogel, Joel, Who Affects Whom in Daily Newspaper Markets?. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=421510

Lisa Megargle George

Hunter College, CUNY ( email )

695 Park Avenue
New York, NY 10065
United States

The Graduate Center, CUNY ( email )

365 Fifth Avenue
New York,, NY 10016
United States

Joel Waldfogel (Contact Author)

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Carlson School of Management ( email )

19th Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55455
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - Department of Economics ( email )

271 19th Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55455
United States

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Abstract Views
747
PlumX Metrics