Migration and Global Network Formation: Evidence from Female Scientists in Developing Countries

50 Pages Posted: 30 Sep 2022

See all articles by Caroline V. Fry

Caroline V. Fry

University of Hawaii at Manoa - UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII - Shidler College of Business; Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Jeffrey L. Furman

Boston University - Department of Strategy & Policy; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: September 28, 2022

Abstract

As agents who have the opportunity to develop connections in multiple geographic locations and networks, migrants are uniquely suited to play brokerage roles in science, innovation, and entrepreneurship. But can they succeed in connecting others in their home and host environments? We investigate this question in the context of women in science in the developing world. We hypothesize that the extent to which such scholars facilitate connections will depend upon the extent to which their home and host country institutional environments support them in this brokerage role. Our analysis finds that female migrants in science are more likely to share international connections with non-migrants at home if their home countries have high levels of gender parity, particularly when their host country also has high levels of gender parity. We interpret these findings as providing evidence that institutional match supports migrant brokerage and the globalization of knowledge production.

Suggested Citation

Fry, Caroline V. and Furman, Jeffrey L., Migration and Global Network Formation: Evidence from Female Scientists in Developing Countries (September 28, 2022). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4231744 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4231744

Caroline V. Fry (Contact Author)

University of Hawaii at Manoa - UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII - Shidler College of Business ( email )

2404 Maile Way
Honolulu, HI 96822
United States

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) ( email )

77 Massachusetts Avenue
50 Memorial Drive
Cambridge, MA 02139-4307
United States

Jeffrey L. Furman

Boston University - Department of Strategy & Policy ( email )

595 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02215
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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