Spatial Crime Patterns and the Introduction of the UK Minimum Wage

21 Pages Posted: 11 Jul 2003

See all articles by Kirstine Hansen

Kirstine Hansen

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Department of Sociology

Stephen J. Machin

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Centre for Economic Performance (CEP); London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Department of Economics

Abstract

This paper provides an empirical evaluation of whether one can uncover a link between crime and the labour market using a research methodology that is different to that utilized in existing work. We exploit a large regulatory change that was made to the UK labour market when a national minimum wage was introduced in April 1999. This minimum wage introduction provided pay increases for quite a large number of low paid workers. From a theoretical perspective we argue that this wage boost could have altered individual incentives to participate in crime. We then go on to develop empirical tests of this hypothesis comparing spatial crime patterns, measured at police force area level, in the years before and after the introduction of the minimum wage floor. Our empirical study of area-level crime rates before and after the minimum wage introduction uncovers a statistically significant link between changes in crime and the extent of area low pay before the minimum wage was introduced. Overall our results are in line with the notion that altering wage incentives can affect crime and therefore that there exists a link between crime and the low wage labour market.

Suggested Citation

Hansen, Kirstine and Machin, Stephen J., Spatial Crime Patterns and the Introduction of the UK Minimum Wage. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=423339

Kirstine Hansen (Contact Author)

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Department of Sociology ( email )

Houghton Street
WC2A 2AE London, England
United Kingdom

Stephen J. Machin

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) ( email )

Houghton Street
London WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Department of Economics ( email )

Houghton Street
London WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom

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