Central and South America

in Francesco Francioni and Ana Filipa Vrdoljak (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of International Cultural Heritage Law (Oxford University Press, 2020) 878-907

24 Pages Posted: 23 Oct 2022

See all articles by Lucas Lixinski

Lucas Lixinski

University of New South Wales (UNSW)

Date Written: October 20, 2020

Abstract

I argue in this chapter that the key defining features of Central and South American regional efforts in the field of heritage are the use of heritage as a tool for development, and the connection between heritage and indigeneity. With respect to development, the main approach is policy-driven, which can be explained both by the nature of the objective (economic), and also by the fact that most organizations engaging in this area have somewhat reduced mandates for rule-making with respect to heritage, as shown below. With respect to indigeneity, on the other hand, rule-making is much stronger, and engages a proud tradition of international law-making in the region, which started as part of a Pan-American reliance on the rules of international law to shield Central and South American nations from European colonialism and US neocolonialism. In the specific area of heritage, there is certainly a conversation between the regional and the global that needs to be accounted for, as this chapter outlines.

Keywords: regionalism, cultural heritage law, development, indigeneity, Latin America

Suggested Citation

Lixinski, Lucas, Central and South America (October 20, 2020). in Francesco Francioni and Ana Filipa Vrdoljak (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of International Cultural Heritage Law (Oxford University Press, 2020) 878-907, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4253261 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4253261

Lucas Lixinski (Contact Author)

University of New South Wales (UNSW) ( email )

Kensington
High St
Sydney, NSW 2052
Australia

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
21
Abstract Views
228
PlumX Metrics