The Incidence and Consequence of Worker Displacement in Australia

16 Pages Posted: 2 Dec 2003

See all articles by Colin P. Green

Colin P. Green

Department of Economics

Gareth Leeves

University of Queensland - School of Economics

Abstract

This paper analyses displacement risk and its consequences for re-employment in Australia using data from the Survey of Employment and Unemployment Patterns (SEUP). We confirm overseas evidence that older workers and those from lower skill occupations are, in general, at a greater risk of displacement. By contrast, unlike US studies, no systematic link between tenure in job and displacement risk was found. Consistent with previous Australian research (Borland and McDonald 2001), we find that males face a higher incidence of displacement than females. Decomposition of the gender difference revealed that industry effects are an important source of disparity in displacement rates. Analysis of re-employment hazards indicated that workers displaced from manufacturing faced increased periods of non-employment. Hence, it appears that there is a role for provisions to help workers in industries where the effects of structural reform have been concentrated (Kletzer 1998).

Suggested Citation

Green, Colin P. and Leeves, Gareth, The Incidence and Consequence of Worker Displacement in Australia. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=430822

Colin P. Green (Contact Author)

Department of Economics ( email )

Høgskoleringen
Trondheim NO-7491, 7491
Norway

Gareth Leeves

University of Queensland - School of Economics ( email )

Brisbane, QLD 4072
Australia

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