Unravelling Nanometallurgy with in Situ Electron-Microscopy: A Case Study with Cu Nanowires

22 Pages Posted: 28 Dec 2022

See all articles by Diego Santa Rosa Coradini

Diego Santa Rosa Coradini

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Matheus Araujo Tunes

Montanuniversität Leoben; Government of the United States of America - Materials Science and Technology Division

Patrick Willenshofer

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Cameron Quick

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Thomas Kremmer

Montanuniversität Leoben - Chair of Nonferrous Metallurgy

Stefan Luidold

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Peter J. Uggowitzer

Montanuniversität Leoben - Chair of Nonferrous Metallurgy

Stefan Pogatscher

Montanuniversität Leoben - Chair of Nonferrous Metallurgy

Abstract

Technological advances set new challenges for materials development. Minia-rtheless, by studying the Cu at the nanoscale, someTechnological advances set new challenges for materials development. Miniaturization of electronic devices demands the migration of metallurgy from macro/micro to the nanoscale, thus requiring a re-definition of existing and classical concepts in metallurgy. The present study reports on the behaviour of pure Cu nanowires with diameters ranging from 40 to 140 nm heated in a low-pressure environment within a transmission electron microscope. The response of Cu nanowires was investigated at different temperatures up to 1123 K and analyzed using electron-microscopy techniques, revealing both volumetric and shape changes over time. Sublimation, with a steady-state length reduction of the nanowires, was identified as the dominant mechanism. Additionally, it was detected that sublimation occurred not only at temperatures above ~ 1023 K, where Cu has a higher vapor pressure than the column pressure of the electron-microscope, but also at temperatures as low as 923 K. This unexpected behavior is explained by the presence of active regions at sharply curved regions at the nanowire tip and the imbalance of evaporation and redeposition rates of Cu atoms due to the experimentally-induced loss of vapor atoms. Nevertheless, by studying the Cu at the nanoscale, some fundamental aspects of the field of nanometallurgy are unraveled.

Keywords: Sublimation, in situ heating experiment, Cu nanowires degradation, surface diffusion, transmission electron microscopy.

Suggested Citation

Santa Rosa Coradini, Diego and Tunes, Matheus Araujo and Willenshofer, Patrick and Quick, Cameron and Kremmer, Thomas and Luidold, Stefan and Uggowitzer, Peter J. and Pogatscher, Stefan, Unravelling Nanometallurgy with in Situ Electron-Microscopy: A Case Study with Cu Nanowires. NANOTODAY-D-22-01375, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4313569 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4313569

Diego Santa Rosa Coradini (Contact Author)

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Matheus Araujo Tunes

Montanuniversität Leoben ( email )

Government of the United States of America - Materials Science and Technology Division ( email )

Los Alamos, NM 87545
United States

Patrick Willenshofer

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Cameron Quick

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Thomas Kremmer

Montanuniversität Leoben - Chair of Nonferrous Metallurgy ( email )

Leoben
Austria

Stefan Luidold

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Peter J. Uggowitzer

Montanuniversität Leoben - Chair of Nonferrous Metallurgy

Leoben
Austria

Stefan Pogatscher

Montanuniversität Leoben - Chair of Nonferrous Metallurgy ( email )

Leoben
Austria

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