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Spin-Phonon Interactions Induced Anomalous Thermal Conductivity in Nickel (Ii) Oxide

16 Pages Posted: 10 Feb 2023 Publication Status: Published

See all articles by Qiyang Sun

Qiyang Sun

University of California, Riverside (UCR)

Songrui Hou

University of California, Riverside (UCR)

Bin Wei

Tsinghua University - State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing

Yaokun Su

University of California, Riverside (UCR)

Victor Ortiz

University of California, Riverside (UCR)

Bo Sun

Tsinghua University

Jiao Lin

Government of the United States of America - Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Hillary Smith

Swarthmore College

Sergey Danilkin

Government of the Commonwealth of Australia - Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation

Douglas L. Abernathy

Government of the United States of America - Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Richard B. Wilson

University of California, Riverside (UCR)

Chen Li

University of California, Riverside (UCR)

Abstract

Nickel (II) oxide is a prominent candidate for spintronic and spin-caloritronic applications operating at room temperature. Although there are extensive studies on nickel oxide, the roles of magnon- and spin-phonon interactions on thermal transport are not well understood. In the present work, the relationship between spin-phonon interactions and thermal transport is investigated by performing inelastic neutron scattering, time-domain thermoreflectance thermal conductivity measurements, and atomistic thermal transport calculations. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the magnon lifetime imply that magnon thermal conductivity is trivial, and so heat is conducted only by phonons. Time-domain thermoreflectance measurements of the thermal conductivity vs. temperature follow T-1.47 in the antiferromagnetic phase. This temperature dependence cannot be explained by phonon-isotope and phonon-defect scattering or phonon softening. Instead, we attribute this to magnon-phonon scattering and spin-induced dynamic symmetry breaking. The spin-phonon interactions are saturated in the paramagnetic phase and lead to a weaker temperature dependence of T-1.00 at 550-700 K. These results reveal the importance of spin-phonon interactions on lattice thermal transport, shedding light on the engineering of functional antiferromagnetic spintronic and spin-caloritronic materials through these interactions.

Keywords: Nickel oxide, Spin-phonon interaction, magnon and phonon dynamics, magnon thermal conductivity, phonon thermal conductivity

Suggested Citation

Sun, Qiyang and Hou, Songrui and Wei, Bin and Su, Yaokun and Ortiz, Victor and Sun, Bo and Lin, Jiao and Smith, Hillary and Danilkin, Sergey and Abernathy, Douglas L. and Wilson, Richard B. and Li, Chen, Spin-Phonon Interactions Induced Anomalous Thermal Conductivity in Nickel (Ii) Oxide. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4354114 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4354114

Qiyang Sun (Contact Author)

University of California, Riverside (UCR) ( email )

900 University Avenue
Riverside, CA CA 92521
United States

Songrui Hou

University of California, Riverside (UCR) ( email )

900 University Avenue
Riverside, CA CA 92521
United States

Bin Wei

Tsinghua University - State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing ( email )

Yaokun Su

University of California, Riverside (UCR) ( email )

900 University Avenue
Riverside, CA CA 92521
United States

Victor Ortiz

University of California, Riverside (UCR) ( email )

900 University Avenue
Riverside, CA CA 92521
United States

Bo Sun

Tsinghua University ( email )

Jiao Lin

Government of the United States of America - Oak Ridge National Laboratory ( email )

1 Bethel Valley Road, P.O. Box 2008, Mail Stop 608
Room B-106, Building 5700
Oak Ridge, TN 37831
United States

Hillary Smith

Swarthmore College ( email )

500 College Ave
Swarthmore, PA 19081
United States

Sergey Danilkin

Government of the Commonwealth of Australia - Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation ( email )

Locked Bag 2001
Kirrawee DC
Sydney, NSW 2232
Australia

Douglas L. Abernathy

Government of the United States of America - Oak Ridge National Laboratory ( email )

1 Bethel Valley Road, P.O. Box 2008, Mail Stop 608
Room B-106, Building 5700
Oak Ridge, TN 37831
United States

Richard B. Wilson

University of California, Riverside (UCR) ( email )

900 University Avenue
Riverside, CA CA 92521
United States

Chen Li

University of California, Riverside (UCR) ( email )

900 University Avenue
Riverside, CA CA 92521
United States

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