Education and Smoking: Were Vietnam War Draft Avoiders Also More Likely to Avoid Smoking?

CIRPEE Working Paper No. 03-28

Posted: 10 Oct 2003

See all articles by Grimard Franque

Grimard Franque

McGill University - Desautels Faculty of Management

Daniel Parent

McGill University - Department of Economics

Date Written: August 2003

Abstract

We use the Vietnam War draft avoidance behavior documented by Card and Lemieux (2002) as a quasi-natural experiment to infer causation from education to smoking and find strong evidence that education, whether it be measured in years of completed schooling or in educational attainment categories, reduces the probability of smoking at the time of the interview, more particularly the probability of smoking regularly. Interestingly, however, while we find that more education substantially increases the probability of never smoking, our other main finding is suggestive that increased education has a limited impact on smoking cessation behavior. On the one hand there is little evidence that it helps to increase the probability of not smoking regularly at the time of the interview, conditional on having smoked regularly at any time. However, among former regular smokers, those with more education have significantly shorter smoking careers.

JEL Classification: I12, I20

Suggested Citation

Franque, Grimard and Parent, Daniel, Education and Smoking: Were Vietnam War Draft Avoiders Also More Likely to Avoid Smoking? (August 2003). CIRPEE Working Paper No. 03-28. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=437082

Grimard Franque

McGill University - Desautels Faculty of Management

1001 Sherbrooke St. West
Montreal, Quebec H3A1G5 H3A 2M1
Canada

Daniel Parent (Contact Author)

McGill University - Department of Economics ( email )

855 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, QC H3A 2T7
Canada
514-398-4846 (Phone)
514-398-4938 (Fax)

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