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A Participatory Epidemiological Study of Major Cattle Diseases in Urban and Peri-Urban Dairy Settings in Ethiopia

19 Pages Posted: 24 May 2023 Publication Status: Under Review

See all articles by Likawent Yeheyis

Likawent Yeheyis

Amhara Agricultural Research Institute

Tilaye Teklewold Deneke

Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research

Mulualem Ambaw

Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research

Henrietta Moore

University College London - Institute for Global Prosperity

Adam Bekele

Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research

Stefan Berg

Animal and Plant Health Agency

Abstract

A participatory epidemiological study was conducted in six towns in Ethiopia where there is an intensive urban and peri-urban dairy production to study farmers’ perspective on the major cattle diseases in terms of their etiology, prevalence, and management. This study was performed within a larger project aiming to support Ethiopia to improve disease control in cattle, and particular on bovine tuberculosis (bTB). The study sites (towns) were Hawassa in the South, Mekele and Gondar in the North, and Holeta, Sululta, and Bishoftu, three towns outside Addis Ababa in the central parts of the country, and at each site two focus group discussions (FGDs) were held; one group for smallholder farmers holding up to five dairy cattle in their residence compound and another group with farm workers and their families from medium and large farms with more than five cattle on site making it a total of 12 FGDs. A total of 156 representatives from the two groups, of which 55 were female, participated in these discussions. We used opened questions to elicit group discussion among participants as well as ranking and scoring techniques using 100 beans. In addition to these 12 FGDs, key informant interviews were held with local animal health service providers and extension personnel. The study revealed that mastitis, hypocalcaemia, Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD), Lumpy Skin Disease (LSD), Blackleg, and coughing, of which the latter may be related to bTB, were ranked as the most prevalent and economically important diseases in these Ethiopian urban and peri-urban dairy farms. The reasons behind this ranking by the participants were found to be impact of the disease on productivity, its contagiousness, availability (or rather lack) of drugs, and costs of treatment. The costs associated with animal isolation and care for disease management is often excessive and can lead to farm bankruptcy. Most often farmers cull diseased animals. This study indicates that in the absence of a monitoring mechanism for animal trading and a poorly controlled regulation for animal slaughtering, unregulated cattle trade and traditional slaughtering remain as primary risk factors for the spread of contagious and zoonotic diseases such as bTB, brucellosis, anthrax, FMD, LSD etc. Hence, a livestock trade movement and slaughtering control mechanism need to be put in place in order to control the spread of diseases.

Keywords: Participatory epidemiology, Dairy farming, Cattle diseases, Bovine TB, Focus group, Zoonosis

Suggested Citation

Yeheyis, Likawent and Deneke, Tilaye Teklewold and Ambaw, Mulualem and Moore, Henrietta and Bekele, Adam and Berg, Stefan, A Participatory Epidemiological Study of Major Cattle Diseases in Urban and Peri-Urban Dairy Settings in Ethiopia. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4447272 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4447272

Likawent Yeheyis (Contact Author)

Amhara Agricultural Research Institute ( email )

Tilaye Teklewold Deneke

Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research ( email )

Mulualem Ambaw

Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research ( email )

Ethiopia

Henrietta Moore

University College London - Institute for Global Prosperity ( email )

London
United Kingdom

Adam Bekele

Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research ( email )

Ethiopia

Stefan Berg

Animal and Plant Health Agency ( email )

Surrey
United Kingdom

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