Observation of Key Phenological Stages of a Forest Pest: Using Citizen Science as a Tool to Inform Research and Management

17 Pages Posted: 29 Jul 2023

See all articles by Nicholas Joseph Dietschler

Nicholas Joseph Dietschler

Cornell University

Tonya D. Bittner

Cornell University

Carrie S. Jubb

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Scott M. Salom

Virginia Tech

Mark Whitmore

Cornell University

Abstract

Increasing efficiency of data gathering at the landscape scale on the growing number of pests and pathogens threatening forests worldwide has potential to improve management outcomes. Citizen science is an active discipline and continues to see growing support and utility in environmental and conservation fields. We present a case study showing how citizen science observations can be used to inform research and management into a devastating forest pest, Adelges tsugae. Adelges tsugae, or the hemlock woolly adelgid, was introduced to eastern North America leading to decline and mortality of eastern and Carolina hemlock. Management activities, most notably biological control, rely on observations of A. tsugae phenology to perform releases and recovery surveys of their highly synchronized specialist predators at appropriate times. In this paper we outline the citizen science program and report phenological observations on A. tsugae. Additionally, we report data comparing A. tsugae aestivation break between sites in Virginia and New York State. This case study illustrates how citizen science programing can be used to inform forest pest management and increase essential basic understanding of A. tsugae developmental biology.

Keywords: citizen science, phenology, Adelges tsugae, forest health, conservation

Suggested Citation

Dietschler, Nicholas Joseph and Bittner, Tonya D. and Jubb, Carrie S. and Salom, Scott M. and Whitmore, Mark, Observation of Key Phenological Stages of a Forest Pest: Using Citizen Science as a Tool to Inform Research and Management. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4525617 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4525617

Nicholas Joseph Dietschler (Contact Author)

Cornell University ( email )

Ithaca, NY 14853
United States

Tonya D. Bittner

Cornell University ( email )

Ithaca, NY 14853
United States

Carrie S. Jubb

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Scott M. Salom

Virginia Tech ( email )

Blacksburg, VA
United States

Mark Whitmore

Cornell University ( email )

Ithaca, NY 14853
United States

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