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Genomic Signatures of Exceptional Longevity and Negligible Aging in the Long-Lived Red Sea Urchin

63 Pages Posted: 30 Aug 2023 Publication Status: Review Complete

See all articles by Jennifer M. Polinski

Jennifer M. Polinski

Gloucester Marine Genomics Institute (GMGI)

Kate R. Castellano

Gloucester Marine Genomics Institute (GMGI)

Katherine M. Buckley

Auburn University

Andrea G. Bodnar

Gloucester Marine Genomics Institute (GMGI)

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Abstract

The red sea urchin (Mesocentrotus franciscanus) is one of the earth’s longest living animals, reported to live more than 100 years with indeterminate growth, life-long reproduction, and no increase in mortality rate with age. To understand the genetic underpinnings of longevity and negligible aging, we constructed a chromosome-level assembly of the red sea urchin genome and compared it to that of short-lived sea urchin species. Genome wide syntenic alignments identified chromosome rearrangements that distinguish short- and long-lived species. Expanded gene families in long-lived species play a role in innate immunity, sensory nervous system, and genome stability. An integrated network of genes under positive selection in the red sea urchin were involved in genomic regulation, protein homeostasis, and mitochondrial function. Our results implicated known longevity genes in sea urchin longevity, but also revealed novel molecular signatures that promote long-term maintenance of tissue homeostasis, disease resistance, and negligible aging.

Keywords: Sea urchin, longevity, aging, negligible senescence, comparative genomics, innate immunity, nervous system, Genome stability

Suggested Citation

Polinski, Jennifer M. and Castellano, Kate R. and Buckley, Katherine M. and Bodnar, Andrea G., Genomic Signatures of Exceptional Longevity and Negligible Aging in the Long-Lived Red Sea Urchin. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4551359 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4551359
This version of the paper has not been formally peer reviewed.

Jennifer M. Polinski

Gloucester Marine Genomics Institute (GMGI) ( email )

Kate R. Castellano

Gloucester Marine Genomics Institute (GMGI) ( email )

Katherine M. Buckley

Auburn University ( email )

415 West Magnolia Avenue
Auburn, AL 36849
United States

Andrea G. Bodnar (Contact Author)

Gloucester Marine Genomics Institute (GMGI) ( email )

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