The Long-Run Impact of Forced Migration: Evidence from the Killing Fields

33 Pages Posted: 13 Sep 2023

See all articles by Chungeun Yoon

Chungeun Yoon

KDI School of Public Policy and Management

Date Written: August 21, 2023

Abstract

This study examines the long-term effects of forced migration on economic and educational outcomes in a low-income country. We explore the Killing Fields in Cambodia, where the Khmer Rouge regime seized power in 1975 and compelled approximately one million people to relocate from urban to rural areas. We find that individuals forced to migrate during the Khmer Rouge regime were likely to eventually transition from the agricultural sector to the service sector. Younger cohorts who experienced forced migration and descendants of migrants who were displaced to the Killing Fields exhibited a decrease in years of schooling compared with those whose families were not forced to migrate. These findings suggest that the repercussions of the Khmer Rouge regime have had persistent impacts on individuals’ employment patterns and educational outcomes across generations.

Keywords: Geographic mobility, Structural change, Education, Civil conflict

JEL Classification: : O15, R23, J61, E24, N45

Suggested Citation

Yoon, Chungeun, The Long-Run Impact of Forced Migration: Evidence from the Killing Fields (August 21, 2023). KDI School of Pub Policy & Management Paper Forthcoming, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4568808 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4568808

Chungeun Yoon (Contact Author)

KDI School of Public Policy and Management ( email )

P.O. Box 184
Seoul, 130-868
Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

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