Protectionism, Trade, and Measures of Damage from Exotic Species Introductions

Posted: 24 Oct 2003

See all articles by Christopher Costello

Christopher Costello

University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) - Donald Bren School of Environmental Science & Management

Carol McAusland

University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) - Donald Bren School of Environmental Science & Management

Abstract

Unintentional introductions of nonindigenous plants, animals, and microbes cause significant ecological and agricultural crop damage worldwide. Trade in both manufactured and agricultural goods is a primary vector for such introductions. Fusing simple models of trade and biological introductions, we explore the links between trade, protectionism, and damage arising from exotic species introductions. We show that it is possible for freer trade to reduce damage arising from exotic species invasions. We also show how current measures of damage - heavily weighted toward agricultural damage - serve as misleading indicators of how restrictions to trade affect total losses arising from exotic species introductions.

Suggested Citation

Costello, Christopher and McAusland, Carol, Protectionism, Trade, and Measures of Damage from Exotic Species Introductions. American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Vol. 85, pp. 964-975, November 2003. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=457778

Christopher Costello (Contact Author)

University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) - Donald Bren School of Environmental Science & Management ( email )

4670 Physical Sciences North
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5131
United States
(805) 893-5802 (Phone)
(805) 893-7612 (Fax)

Carol McAusland

University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) - Donald Bren School of Environmental Science & Management ( email )

Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5131
United States
805-893-4823 (Phone)
805-893-8830 (Fax)

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