International Governance of Civilian AI: A Jurisdictional Certification Approach

52 Pages Posted: 23 Sep 2023 Last revised: 19 Oct 2023

See all articles by Robert Trager

Robert Trager

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)

Ben Harack

University of Oxford

Anka Reuel

Stanford University

Allison Carnegie

Columbia University - Department of Political Science

Lennart Heim

Centre for the Governance of AI

Lewis Ho

Cornell University - Department of Government

Sarah Kreps

Cornell University - Department of Government

Ranjit Lall

University of Oxford

Owen Larter

Microsoft

Seán Ó hÉigeartaigh

University of Cambridge - Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence

Simon Staffell

Microsoft

José Jaime Villalobos

Institute for Law & AI

Date Written: August 31, 2023

Abstract

This report describes trade-offs in the design of international governance ar- rangements for civilian artificial intelligence (AI) and presents one approach in detail. This approach represents the extension of a standards, licensing, and liability regime to the global level. We propose that states establish an International AI Organization (IAIO) to certify state jurisdictions (not firms or AI projects) for compliance with international oversight standards. States can give force to these international standards by adopting regulations prohibit- ing the import of goods whose supply chains embody AI from non-IAIO- certified jurisdictions. This borrows attributes from models of existing inter- national organizations, such as the International Civilian Aviation Organiza- tion (ICAO), the International Maritime Organization (IMO), and the Finan- cial Action Task Force (FATF). States can also adopt multilateral controls on the export of AI product inputs, such as specialized hardware, to non-certified jurisdictions. Indeed, both the import and export standards could be required for certification. As international actors reach consensus on risks of and min- imum standards for advanced AI, a jurisdictional certification regime could mitigate a broad range of potential harms, including threats to public safety.

Suggested Citation

Trager, Robert and Harack, Ben and Reuel, Anka and Carnegie, Allison and Heim, Lennart and Ho, Lewis and Kreps, Sarah and Lall, Ranjit and Larter, Owen and Ó hÉigeartaigh, Seán and Staffell, Simon and Villalobos Ruiz, José Jaime, International Governance of Civilian AI: A Jurisdictional Certification Approach (August 31, 2023). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4579899 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4579899

Robert Trager (Contact Author)

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) ( email )

405 Hilgard Avenue
Box 951361
Los Angeles, CA 90095
United States

Ben Harack

University of Oxford

Anka Reuel

Stanford University

Allison Carnegie

Columbia University - Department of Political Science ( email )

1331 International Affairs Bldg.
420 W. 118th Street
New York, NY 10027
United States

Lennart Heim

Centre for the Governance of AI

Lewis Ho

Cornell University - Department of Government

Sarah Kreps

Cornell University - Department of Government ( email )

Ranjit Lall

University of Oxford ( email )

Owen Larter

Microsoft

Seán Ó hÉigeartaigh

University of Cambridge - Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence

Simon Staffell

Microsoft

José Jaime Villalobos Ruiz

Institute for Law & AI ( email )

1427 Cambridge St
#5
Cambridge, MA 02139
United States

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