A Meta-Analysis of Government-Sponsored Training Programs

Posted: 12 Nov 2003

See all articles by David H. Greenberg

David H. Greenberg

University of Maryland Baltimore County

Charles Michalopoulos

MDRC - Welfare Reform

Philip K. Robins

University of Miami - School of Business Administration - Department of Economics

Abstract

This study uses meta-analysis to synthesize findings from 31 evaluations of 15 voluntary government-funded training programs for the disadvantaged that operated between 1964 and 1998. On average, the earnings effects of the evaluated programs seem to have been largest for women, quite modest for men, and negligible for youths. For men and women, the earnings effects of training appear to have persisted for at least several years after the training was complete. Classroom skills training was apparently effective in increasing earnings, but basic education was not. There is no evidence that more expensive training programs performed better than less expensive ones. Although the United States has more than three decades of experience in running training programs, the programs do not appear to have become more effective over time.

Keywords: training programs, program evaluation, earnings effects of training programs

JEL Classification: J24, I38

Suggested Citation

Greenberg, David H. and Michalopoulos, Charles and Robins, Philip K., A Meta-Analysis of Government-Sponsored Training Programs. Industrial & Labor Relations Review, Vol. 57, No. 1, October 2003, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=458301

David H. Greenberg

University of Maryland Baltimore County ( email )

1000 Hilltop Circle
Baltimore, MD 21250
United States
410-884-9620 (Phone)

Charles Michalopoulos

MDRC - Welfare Reform ( email )

19th Floor
16 East 34th St.
New York, NY 10016-4326
United States
703-231-5942 (Phone)

Philip K. Robins (Contact Author)

University of Miami - School of Business Administration - Department of Economics ( email )

P.O. Box 248126
Coral Gables, FL 33124-6550
United States
305-284-5664 (Phone)
305-284-2985 (Fax)

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