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Handwritten Bank Check Recognition of Courtesy Amounts

20 Pages Posted: 20 Jan 2004  

Rafael Palacios

Universidad Pontificia Comillas

Amar Gupta

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Patrick S.P. Wang

Northeastern University - College of Computer and Information Science

Date Written: January 2004

Abstract

In spite of rapid evolution of electronic techniques, a number of large-scale applications continue to rely on the use of paper as the dominant medium. This is especially true for processing of bank checks. This paper examines the issue of reading the numerical amount field. In the case of checks, the segmentation of unconstrained strings into individual digits is a challenging task because of connected and overlapping digits, broken digits, and digits that are physically connected to pieces of strokes from neighboring digits. The proposed architecture involves four stages: segmentation of the string into individual digits, normalization, recognition of each character using a neural network classifier, and syntactic verification. Overall, this paper highlights the importance of employing a hybrid architecture that incorporates multiple approaches to provide high recognition rates.

Keywords: Handwritten checks; Reading of unconstrained handwritten material; neural network

Suggested Citation

Palacios, Rafael and Gupta, Amar and Wang, Patrick S.P., Handwritten Bank Check Recognition of Courtesy Amounts (January 2004). MIT Sloan Working Paper No. 4461-04; Eller College Working Paper No. 1017-05. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=489783 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.489783

Rafael Palacios (Contact Author)

Universidad Pontificia Comillas ( email )

Alberto Aguilera 21
Madrid, Madrid 28015
Spain

Amar Gupta

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) ( email )

77 Massachusetts Avenue
Building 32-256
Cambridge, MA 02139
United States
617-253-0418 (Phone)

Patrick S.P. Wang

Northeastern University - College of Computer and Information Science ( email )

360 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
United States
617-373-3711 (Phone)
617-373-5121 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://www.ccs.neu.edu/home/pwang

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