The Unintended Consequences of the '91 Civil Rights Act

6 Pages Posted: 23 Feb 2004  

Paul Oyer

Stanford Graduate School of Business; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Scott Schaefer

University of Utah - Department of Finance

Abstract

The emphasis on firing-based litigation has had subtle but important effects.

In the debate over the legislation that would become the 1991 Civil Rights Act, supporters of the bill argued that it was necessary to open opportunities for women and minorities in industries that had traditionally been unwelcoming, while opponents criticized it as a "quota bill" and "lawyers' bonanza." Our research suggests that the opponents' quota-based hiring fears were unfounded, but the bill also appears not to have improved minority employment in traditionally exclusionary industries, and may have even reversed what to that point had been improving minority employment trends in those industries.

Keywords: Civil Rights Act, litigation, labor policy, quotas, industrial policy, employment, employment trends, minority employment, federal regulations, regulations

JEL Classification: J7, J78, J21, K31

Suggested Citation

Oyer, Paul and Schaefer, Scott, The Unintended Consequences of the '91 Civil Rights Act. Regulation, Vol. 26, No. 2, pp. 42-47, Summer 2003. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=505642

Paul Oyer (Contact Author)

Stanford Graduate School of Business ( email )

655 Knight Way
Stanford, CA 94305-5015
United States
650-736-1047 (Phone)
650-725-0468 (Fax)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Scott Schaefer

University of Utah - Department of Finance ( email )

David Eccles School of Business
Salt Lake City, UT 84112
United States

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