Progress and Poverty in Early Modern Europe

41 Pages Posted: 15 Apr 2004  

Robert C. Allen

University of Oxford - Department of Economics

Liam Brunt

NHH - Norwegian School of Economics; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

Abstract

An econometric model of economic development is estimated with data from leading European countries between 1300 and 1800. The model explores the impact of population, enclosure, empire, representative government, technology, and literacy on urbanization, agricultural productivity, proto-industry, and the real wage. Simulations show that the main factors leading to economic success in north-western Europe were the growth of American and Asian commerce and, especially, the innovations underlying the export of the new draperies in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The enclosure of the open fields, representative government, and the spread of literacy did not play major roles.

Suggested Citation

Allen, Robert C. and Brunt, Liam, Progress and Poverty in Early Modern Europe. Economic History Review, Vol. 56, pp. 403-443, August 2003. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=513531

Robert C. Allen (Contact Author)

University of Oxford - Department of Economics ( email )

Manor Road Building
Manor Road
Oxford, OX1 3BJ
United Kingdom

Liam Brunt

NHH - Norwegian School of Economics ( email )

Department of Economics
Helleveien 30
N-5035 Bergen, Hordaland
Norway

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

77 Bastwick Street
London, EC1V 3PZ
United Kingdom

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