Europeanisation and the Uneven Convergence of Environmental Policy: Explaining the Geography of EMAS

Environment and Planning C, Vol. 22, No. 6, pp. 881-897, 2004

39 Pages Posted: 24 Mar 2004 Last revised: 27 Jun 2010

See all articles by Richard Perkins

Richard Perkins

University of Plymouth - School of Geography

Eric Neumayer

London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE)

Date Written: August 1, 2004

Abstract

This paper seeks to advance current understanding of uneven convergence in the context of EU environmental policy, and specifically, the Eco-Management and Audit Scheme (EMAS). Using a large sample, quantitative methodology, we examine three broad sets of determinants hypothesised to influence geographic patterns of policy convergence: (1) cross-national market integration; (2) compatibility between the domestic regulatory context and European policy requirements; and (3) bottom-up pressure from market and societal actors. Our analysis provides empirical support for all three hypothesised determinants. We find that measures of import-export ties, regulatory burden, past policy adoptions, environmental demand from civil society and levels of economic productivity, are all statistically significant predictors of national EMAS counts. Against a backdrop of geographically diverse regulatory institutions, societal conditions and trading relationships, we conclude that unevenness is an inevitable feature of Europeanisation.

Suggested Citation

Perkins, Richard and Neumayer, Eric, Europeanisation and the Uneven Convergence of Environmental Policy: Explaining the Geography of EMAS (August 1, 2004). Environment and Planning C, Vol. 22, No. 6, pp. 881-897, 2004. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=519382 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.519382

Richard Perkins

University of Plymouth - School of Geography ( email )

Drake Circus
Plymouth, PL4 8AA
United Kingdom

Eric Neumayer (Contact Author)

London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) ( email )

Houghton Street
London, WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom
+44 207 955 7598 (Phone)
+44 207 955 7412 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://personal.lse.ac.uk/neumayer

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