The Ownership and Use of Small Kitchen Domestic Appliances: Case Study, Liverpool

7 Pages Posted: 9 Jul 2004

See all articles by Aglaia Efstathiou

Aglaia Efstathiou

Liverpool John Moores University - Faculty of Education, Community and Leisure

Diane Grant

Liverpool John Moores University - Faculty of Education, Community and Leisure

Sheila M. Maxwell

Liverpool John Moores University - Faculty of Education, Community and Leisure

Abstract

The nutritional habits of UK consumers have become a cause for concern with an increasing number of people suffering from diseases related to nutrition. The way in which food is prepared may contribute to the nutritional content of the diet. Traditional methods of cooking and eating are being influenced by increased ownership of domestic appliances. This study aimed to carry out a cross sectional study of people living on Merseyside to determine the ownership and use of small kitchen domestic appliances in relation to the possible consequences the appliances may have on the nutrient intake of the individual. An opportunistic sample of 276 female adults aged 25-70 years was recruited from amongst university staff and community groups within Merseyside. Data were collected using a self-completion questionnaire consisting of questions concerning personal details, the ownership and use of domestic appliances that may influence nutrient intake. The Liverpool John Moores University Ethics Committee granted ethical approval. Microwave ovens, electric toasters and grills were owned by 80% of the population. Coffee makers, handheld electric food mixers, sandwich makers, blenders and food processors although owned by over 45% were used by the majority only once a week or less. Newer items such as a bread maker were owned by 9% who were significantly more likely to have a professional occupation. Those with unskilled occupations were significantly more likely to own a deep fat fryer and least likely to own a food processor. Those aged 25-34 years were significantly least likely to own a handheld food mixer. Households comprised of couples with or without children were significantly more likely to own sandwich makers, bread makers, food processors and handheld food mixers. No difference in the use of the appliances was found with occupational group or age. A large percentage of people own a variety of domestic appliances, the use of which may have a beneficial effect on their nutrient intake, however, it is of concern that those in the lower socio-economic group were more likely to own appliances that will have a negative effect on their diet.

Suggested Citation

Efstathiou, Aglaia and Grant, Diane and Maxwell, Sheila M., The Ownership and Use of Small Kitchen Domestic Appliances: Case Study, Liverpool. International Journal of Consumer Studies, Vol. 28, No. 3, pp. 305-311, June 2004. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=547559

Aglaia Efstathiou

Liverpool John Moores University - Faculty of Education, Community and Leisure

IM Marsh Campus
Barkhill Road
Liverpool L1 5UX
United Kingdom

Diane Grant (Contact Author)

Liverpool John Moores University - Faculty of Education, Community and Leisure ( email )

IM Marsh Campus
Barkhill Road
Liverpool L1 5UX
United Kingdom
+44 (0)151 231 5301 (Phone)

Sheila M. Maxwell

Liverpool John Moores University - Faculty of Education, Community and Leisure

IM Marsh Campus
Barkhill Road
Liverpool L1 5UX
United Kingdom

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