Great Moments in Financial Economics: Iii. Short-Sales and Stock Prices

Journal of Investment Management, Vol. 2, No. 1, First Quarter 2004

Posted: 26 Jul 2004

See all articles by Mark Rubinstein

Mark Rubinstein

University of California, Berkeley - Haas School of Business

Abstract

This is the third in a series of articles on Great Moments in Financial Economics to appear in the Journal. For each, the purpose is to trace, as well as the author can, the history of the development of an important idea. In this case, the idea, usually associated with the work of Edward Miller, is that in the real-world of investors with (1) heterogeneous beliefs and of markets with (2) significant barriers to short-sales, stocks for which these barriers are binding will have prices at least temporarily too high relative to an alternative economy in which these two features are not both simultaneously present. In the early 21st century, this idea has experienced a sort of renaissance of research which has been used to explain a large number of phenomena which can otherwise appear anomalous, from the momentum factor in stock returns, to market crashes, to the recent Internet-based stock market "bubble", and to the growing popularity of certain hedge fund strategies.

Keywords: Short sales, heterogeneous beliefs

JEL Classification: G00

Suggested Citation

Rubinstein, Mark E., Great Moments in Financial Economics: Iii. Short-Sales and Stock Prices. Journal of Investment Management, Vol. 2, No. 1, First Quarter 2004, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=555383

Mark E. Rubinstein (Contact Author)

University of California, Berkeley - Haas School of Business ( email )

545 Student Services Building, #1900
2220 Piedmont Avenue
Berkeley, CA 94720
United States
510-642-3580 (Phone)
510-643-1420 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://www.haas.berkeley.edu/finance/rubinste.html

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Abstract Views
2,355
PlumX Metrics