Trade Union Presence and Employer-Provided Training in Great Britain

26 Pages Posted: 2 Jul 2004

See all articles by René Böheim

René Böheim

Johannes Kepler University

Alison L. Booth

Australian National University (ANU) - Research School of Social Sciences (RSSS); Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Abstract

Using linked employer-employee data from the British 1998 Workplace Employee Relations Survey, we find a positive correlation between workplace union recognition and private-sector employer-provided training. We explore the avenues through which union recognition might affect training by interacting recognition with the closed shop, the level at which pay bargaining takes place, and multi-unionism. For non-manual-labor men and women, only union recognition matters. The various types of collective-bargaining institutions have no separate effect. However, the male manual training probability is significantly increased by union presence only through multiple unionism with joint negotiation. In contrast, for women manual workers, union recognition at the workplace has no effect on the training probability.

Suggested Citation

Boheim, Rene and Booth, Alison L., Trade Union Presence and Employer-Provided Training in Great Britain. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=555524

Rene Boheim (Contact Author)

Johannes Kepler University ( email )

Linz
Austria

Alison L. Booth

Australian National University (ANU) - Research School of Social Sciences (RSSS) ( email )

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200
Australia
+61 2 6125 3285 (Phone)
+61 2 6125 0182 (Fax)

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

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