Border Rights

FROM THE MARGINS OF GLOBALIZATION: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON HUMAN RIGHTS, Neve Gordon, ed., New York: Lexington Books, Forthcoming

23 Pages Posted: 22 Jun 2004

See all articles by Audrey Macklin

Audrey Macklin

University of Toronto - Faculty of Law

Abstract

Immigration laws and policies articulate global supply with local demand by delimiting the terms of entry, duration and residence. In the case of sex-trade workers, the formal stance of most wealthy states tends toward exclusion of non-citizens and criminalization of prostitution. The result is that foreign women who engage enter and work without legal authorization (which necessarily encompasses illegal sex work) are doubly criminalized. Canada's policy distinguishes it from many other Western nations in that Canada actually proffers a temporary work permit to 'exotic dancers,' otherwise known as strippers. While this policy makes Canada somewhat anomalous among states, the practical consequences for many women are not unique. Examining the Canadian policy in light of international anti-trafficking campaign provides a useful vehicle for exposing the competing and contradictory discourses animating state policies regarding the entry of foreign women into the domestic market for sex.

Suggested Citation

Macklin, Audrey, Border Rights. FROM THE MARGINS OF GLOBALIZATION: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON HUMAN RIGHTS, Neve Gordon, ed., New York: Lexington Books, Forthcoming, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=557004

Audrey Macklin (Contact Author)

University of Toronto - Faculty of Law ( email )

78 and 84 Queen's Park
Toronto, Ontario M5S 2C5
Canada
416-946-7493 (Phone)
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