The Impact of 9/11 on Hours of Work in the United States

FRB of Atlanta Working Paper No. 2004-16

17 Pages Posted: 22 Aug 2004

See all articles by Julie L. Hotchkiss

Julie L. Hotchkiss

Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta; Georgia State University - Department of Economics

Olga Pavlova

Georgia State University

Date Written: July 2004

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether workers' commitment to the labor force declined after 9/11, as many popular press accounts at the time suggested it would. The results indicate that any measured decline in hours spent working was the result of economic conditions rather than changes in desired hours of work. Controlling for economic conditions, hours of work after 9/11 actually increased on average compared to before 9/11; no significant change in hours spent working occurred among residents of New York City, however.

Keywords: Labor supply, impact of 9/11, hours of work

JEL Classification: J22, Z19

Suggested Citation

Hotchkiss, Julie L. and Pavlova, Olga, The Impact of 9/11 on Hours of Work in the United States (July 2004). FRB of Atlanta Working Paper No. 2004-16. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=579081 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.579081

Julie L. Hotchkiss (Contact Author)

Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta ( email )

Research Department
1000 Peachtree Street N.E.
Atlanta, GA 30309-4470
United States
404-498-8198 (Phone)
404-498-8058 (Fax)

Georgia State University - Department of Economics ( email )

P.O. Box 3992
Atlanta, GA 30302-3992
United States

Olga Pavlova

Georgia State University ( email )

35 Broad Street
Atlanta, GA 30302
United States

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