Restrictive Labor Practices in Seaports

47 Pages Posted: 20 Apr 2016

See all articles by Ariel Dinar

Ariel Dinar

World Bank - Agriculture and Rural Development Department

Trichur K. Balakrishnan

World Bank - Rural Development Unit (SASRD)

Joseph Wambia

World Bank - Rural Development Unit (SASRD)

Date Written: October 31, 1990

Abstract

Containerization and modern bulk handling methods can substantially increase ship and labor productivity. This paper argues that many ports have failed to change their labor practices and to accept the inevitable reduction in their labor force that technological advances call for. Those ports are doubly penalized by incurring investment costs and continuing to pay labor as if earlier labor-intensive methods still applied. The author analyzes limits on entry to work in the port, an exclusive definition of dock work, job demarcation to prevent interchanging labor, work-sharing requirements within groups that prevent specialization, work-extending practices, restrictive work hours, and restrictions on output. The paper then analyzes how restrictive practices increase shipping costs and how employment would be affected if these practices were abolished. Examples of three approaches to abolishing restrictive practices are given.

Keywords: Transport and Trade Logistics, Common Carriers Industry, Transport Security, Work & Working Conditions, Ports & Waterways

Suggested Citation

Dinar, Ariel and Balakrishnan, Trichur K. and Wambia, Joseph, Restrictive Labor Practices in Seaports (October 31, 1990). World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 514. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=604974

Ariel Dinar (Contact Author)

World Bank - Agriculture and Rural Development Department ( email )

1818 H Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20433
United States
202-473-0434 (Phone)

Trichur K. Balakrishnan

World Bank - Rural Development Unit (SASRD)

1818 H St, NW
Washington, DC 20433
United States

Joseph Wambia

World Bank - Rural Development Unit (SASRD)

1818 H St, NW
Washington, DC 20433
United States

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