Formal and Informal Regulation of Industrial Pollution: Comparative Evidence from Indonesia and the United States

22 Pages Posted: 20 Apr 2016

See all articles by Sheoli Pargal

Sheoli Pargal

World Bank - Development Research Group (DECRG)

Hemamala Hettig

World Bank

Manjula Singh

World Bank

David Wheeler

World Bank - Policy Research Department

Date Written: July 1997

Abstract

In both countries the higher the level of community income, the lower the pollution intensity of local plants. This paper provides support for the idea that community-based pressure on plants to abate pollution exists, even in the presence of formal regulation.

Pargal, Hettige, Singh, and Wheeler start from the premise that governments act as agents of the public in regulating pollution, using the instruments at their disposal. But when formal regulatory mechanisms are absent or ineffective, communities will seek other means of translating their preferences into reality. Recent empirical work suggests the widespread existence of such informal regulation: communities are often able to negotiate with or otherwise informally pressure polluting plants in their vicinity to clean up.

Their thesis is that such informal regulation is likely wherever formal regulation leaves a gap between actual and locally preferred environmental quality. They use plant-level data from Indonesia and the United States - countries that are very different, both socioeconomically and in terms of pollution regulation - test a model of equilibrium pollution under informal regulation.

Their results suggest three common elements across countries and pollutants: ° Abatement is generally subject to significant scale economies. ° Within-country variations in labor and energy prices have little impact on pollution intensity. ° Community incomes have a powerful negative association with pollution intensity.

Their findings on community income are especially important, as they suggest a powerful role for informal regulation whether or not formal regulation is in place. The impact of income disparity on intercounty differences in U.S. pollution intensities seems to match the impact in Indonesia. Undoubtedly, this reflects differences in both preference for environmental quality and ability to bring pressure on polluting factories. The fact that such disparities exist in the United States, even for traditionally regulated pollutants, shows that U.S. regulation has not been able to ensure uniform environmental quality for all citizens regardless of income class.

This paper - a product of the Development Research Group - is part of a larger effort in the group to understand the pollution abatement pressures faced by firms.

Suggested Citation

Pargal, Sheoli and Hettig, Hemamala and Singh, Manjula and Wheeler, David, Formal and Informal Regulation of Industrial Pollution: Comparative Evidence from Indonesia and the United States (July 1997). World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 1797. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=615028

Sheoli Pargal (Contact Author)

World Bank - Development Research Group (DECRG) ( email )

1818 H. Street, N.W.
MSN3-311
Washington, DC 20433
United States

Hemamala Hettig

World Bank

1818 H Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20433
United States

Manjula Singh

World Bank

1818 H Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20433
United States

David Wheeler

World Bank - Policy Research Department ( email )

1818 H Street N.W.
Washington, DC 20433
United States

HOME PAGE: http://econ.worldbank.org/staff/dwheeler

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
118
Abstract Views
1,691
rank
234,635
PlumX Metrics