Complex Network Phenomena in Telecommunication Systems

Networks and Spatial Economics, Vol. 5, No. 4, 2005

24 Pages Posted: 12 Nov 2004 Last revised: 20 Sep 2010

See all articles by Laurie Schintler

Laurie Schintler

George Mason University - School of Policy, Government, and International Affairs

Sean P. Gorman

George Mason University - School of Policy, Government, and International Affairs

Aura Reggiani

University of Bologna - Department of Economics

Roberto Patuelli

University of Bologna - Department of Economics; University of Bologna - Rimini Center for Economic Analysis (RCEA)

Andy Gillespie

University of Newcastle upon Tyne

Peter Nijkamp

VU University of Amsterdam - Department of Spatial Economics; Tinbergen Institute

Jonathan A. Rutherford

University of Newcastle - Economics

Abstract

Many networks such as the Internet have been found to possess scale-free and small-world network properties reflected by so-called power law distributions. Scale-free properties evolve in large complex networks through self-organizing processes and more specifically, preferential attachment. New nodes in a network tend to attach themselves to other vertices that are already well-connected. Because traffic is routed mainly through a few highly connected and concentrated vertices, the diameter of the network is small in comparison to other network structures, and movement through the network is therefore efficient. At the same time, this efficiency feature puts scale-free networks at risk for becoming disconnected or significantly disrupted when super-connected nodes are removed either unintentionally or through a targeted attack or external force. The present paper will examine and compare properties of telecommunications networks for both the United States and Europe. Both types of networks will be examined in terms of their network topology and specifically whether or not they are scale-free networks to be further explored by identifying and plotting power law distributions. Next, economic, political and cultural factors may be used to explain differences in network structures between the United States and Europe. In addition, the paper will identify data and modeling tools that are needed to facilitate further cross-Atlantic comparative studies of communications networks.

Keywords: Complex networks, telecommunications, power law distributions, exponential distributions, Europe and US

JEL Classification: L96, D85, C16

Suggested Citation

Schintler, Laurie and Gorman, Sean P. and Reggiani, Aura and Patuelli, Roberto and Gillespie, Andy and Nijkamp, Peter and Rutherford, Jonathan A., Complex Network Phenomena in Telecommunication Systems. Networks and Spatial Economics, Vol. 5, No. 4, 2005. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=617266 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.617266

Laurie Schintler (Contact Author)

George Mason University - School of Policy, Government, and International Affairs ( email )

Founders Hall
3351 Fairfax Dr.
Arlington, VA 22201
United States

Sean P. Gorman

George Mason University - School of Policy, Government, and International Affairs ( email )

Founders Hall
3351 Fairfax Dr.
Arlington, VA 22201
United States

Aura Reggiani

University of Bologna - Department of Economics ( email )

Piazza Scaravilli, 2
Bologna, 40126
Italy

Roberto Patuelli

University of Bologna - Department of Economics ( email )

via Anghera' 22
Rimini, 47921
Italy
+39-0541-434276 (Phone)
+39-02-700419665 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://https://sites.google.com/site/patuellihomepage/

University of Bologna - Rimini Center for Economic Analysis (RCEA)

Via Patara, 3
Rimini (RN), RN 47900
Italy

Andy Gillespie

University of Newcastle upon Tyne ( email )

Centre for Urban and Regional Development Studies
England NE1 7RU
United Kingdom

Peter Nijkamp

VU University of Amsterdam - Department of Spatial Economics ( email )

De Boelelaan 1105
1081HV Amsterdam
Netherlands
+31 20 4446091 (Phone)
+31 20 4445611 (Fax)

Tinbergen Institute

Gustav Mahlerplein 117
Amsterdam, 1082 MS
Netherlands

Jonathan A. Rutherford

University of Newcastle - Economics ( email )

Centre for Urban and Regional Development Studies
England NE1 7RU
United Kingdom

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
289
Abstract Views
2,952
rank
107,580
PlumX Metrics