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A Penny for Their Thoughts: Draft Resistance at the Poston Relocation Center

57 Pages Posted: 7 Dec 2004  

Eric L. Muller

University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill - School of Law

Abstract

Resistance to the Japanese American internment by the small handful of internees whose cases went to the United States Supreme Court is well known. Resistance to the internment, however, ran broader and deeper than those few cases would suggest. This article tells the story of the just over one hundred Japanese American internees from the Poston Relocation Center who resisted the military draft in 1944 in protest of the deprivation of their rights as U.S. citizens. They were prosecuted for draft evasion, and a federal judge sentenced sub-groups of them variously to terms of 3 years in prison, 1 year in prison, and a fine of one penny. The article defends these shifting and seemingly contradictory sentences that the judge imposed on the Japanese American draft resisters of the Poston Relocation Center as accurate reflections of the complex and varied motives of the draft resisters themselves.

Keywords: Japanese Americans, internment, draft resistance, civil liberties

Suggested Citation

Muller, Eric L., A Penny for Their Thoughts: Draft Resistance at the Poston Relocation Center. Law and Contemporary Problems, Vol. 68, Winter 2004. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=631183

Eric L. Muller (Contact Author)

University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill - School of Law ( email )

Van Hecke-Wettach Hall, 160 Ridge Road
CB #3380
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3380
United States
919-962-7067 (Phone)
919-962-1277 (Fax)

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