The Hidden Costs of Ethnic Conflict: Decomposing Trends in Educational Outcomes of Young Kosovars

32 Pages Posted: 20 Apr 2016

See all articles by Soumya Alva

Soumya Alva

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Edmundo Murrugarra

World Bank

Pierella Paci

World Bank

Date Written: August 2002

Abstract

Alva, Murrugarra, and Paci examine the impact of ethnic segmentation in education on educational outcomes. Between 1991 and the late 1990s, the Albanian Kosovar population received education services in an informal system parallel to the official one. Using the 2000 Kosovo LSMS Survey data, the authors exploit cohort differences in exposure to the parallel system to estimate its effects among Albanian youth. The first (untreated) cohort includes individuals who entered secondary education before 1991 when the "parallel" education system was initiated. The second (treated) cohort includes individuals who entered secondary school in the last ten years under the ethnically segmented education system. To disentangle the effects of the changing system and economic environment, and the changes in the characteristics of the population, a Oaxaca-type decomposition is used.

The results suggest that the past decade of ethnic tension has claimed a substantial toll on the educational outcomes of young male Albanian Kosovars. In addition to declines in enrollment rates in secondary education, those who are enrolled are expected to complete one less year of education. However, secondary school enrollment for girls increased during the parallel system, but with a sharp decline in the expected number of years completed.

This paper - a product of the Human Development Sector Unit, Europe and Central Asia Region - is part of a larger effort in the region to examine poverty and social service delivery issues.

Suggested Citation

Alva, Soumya and Murrugarra, Edmundo and Paci, Pierella, The Hidden Costs of Ethnic Conflict: Decomposing Trends in Educational Outcomes of Young Kosovars (August 2002). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=636243

Soumya Alva (Contact Author)

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill ( email )

102 Ridge Road
Chapel Hill, NC NC 27514
United States

Edmundo Murrugarra

World Bank ( email )

1818 H Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20433
United States

Pierella Paci

World Bank ( email )

Washington, DC 20433
United States