Child Growth, Shocks, and Food Aid in Rural Ethiopia

31 Pages Posted: 20 Apr 2016

See all articles by Takashi Yamano

Takashi Yamano

World Bank - Africa Region; Michigan State University - Department of Agricultural Economics

Harold Alderman

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

Luc Christiaensen

World Bank

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: August 2003

Abstract

Over the past decades child stunting in Ethiopia has persisted at alarming rates. While the country experienced several droughts during this period, it also received enormous amounts of food aid, leading some to question the effectiveness of food aid in reducing child malnutrition. Using nationally representative household surveys from 1995-96 and controlling for program placement, Yamano, Alderman, and Christiaensen find that children between 6 and 24 months experienced about 0.9 cm less growth over a six-month period in communities where half the crop area was damaged compared with those without crop damage. Food aid was also found to have a substantial effect on the growth of children in this age group. And on average, the total amount of food aid appeared to be sufficient to protect children against plot damage, an encouraging sign that food aid can act as an effective insurance mechanism, though its cost-effectiveness needs further investigation.

This paper - a product of Public Services, Development Research Group - is part of a larger effort in the group to understand the consequences of economic shocks.

Suggested Citation

Yamano, Takashi and Alderman, Harold and Christiaensen, Luc, Child Growth, Shocks, and Food Aid in Rural Ethiopia (August 2003). World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 3128. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=636548

Takashi Yamano (Contact Author)

World Bank - Africa Region ( email )

1818 H Street
Washington, DC 20433
United States

Michigan State University - Department of Agricultural Economics ( email )

East Lansing, MI 48824
United States

Harold Alderman

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) ( email )

1201 Eye St, NW,
Washington, DC 20005
United States

Luc Christiaensen

World Bank ( email )

1818 H Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20433
United States

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